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Title: Characterizing uncertain sea-level rise projections to support investment decisions

Authors:
ORCiD logo; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1419827
Grant/Contract Number:
PIAMDDI
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
PLoS ONE
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 13; Journal Issue: 2; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-02-07 13:29:38; Journal ID: ISSN 1932-6203
Publisher:
Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Sriver, Ryan L., Lempert, Robert J., Wikman-Svahn, Per, Keller, Klaus, and Bishopric, ed., Nanette H. Characterizing uncertain sea-level rise projections to support investment decisions. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0190641.
Sriver, Ryan L., Lempert, Robert J., Wikman-Svahn, Per, Keller, Klaus, & Bishopric, ed., Nanette H. Characterizing uncertain sea-level rise projections to support investment decisions. United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0190641.
Sriver, Ryan L., Lempert, Robert J., Wikman-Svahn, Per, Keller, Klaus, and Bishopric, ed., Nanette H. Wed . "Characterizing uncertain sea-level rise projections to support investment decisions". United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0190641.
@article{osti_1419827,
title = {Characterizing uncertain sea-level rise projections to support investment decisions},
author = {Sriver, Ryan L. and Lempert, Robert J. and Wikman-Svahn, Per and Keller, Klaus and Bishopric, ed., Nanette H.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0190641},
journal = {PLoS ONE},
number = 2,
volume = 13,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 07 00:00:00 EST 2018},
month = {Wed Feb 07 00:00:00 EST 2018}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1371/journal.pone.0190641

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