skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: A Survey of WEC Reliability, Survival and Design Practices

Abstract

A wave energy converter must be designed to survive and function efficiently, often in highly energetic ocean environments. This represents a challenging engineering problem, comprising systematic failure mode analysis, environmental characterization, modeling, experimental testing, fatigue and extreme response analysis. While, when compared with other ocean systems such as ships and offshore platforms, there is relatively little experience in wave energy converter design, a great deal of recent work has been done within these various areas. Here, this article summarizes the general stages and workflow for wave energy converter design, relying on supporting articles to provide insight. By surveying published work on wave energy converter survival and design response analyses, this paper seeks to provide the reader with an understanding of the different components of this process and the range of methodologies that can be brought to bear. In this way, the reader is provided with a large set of tools to perform design response analyses on wave energy converters.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  2. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1419414
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5000-70718
Journal ID: ISSN 1996-1073; ENERGA
Grant/Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308; NA0003525
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Energies (Basel)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Energies (Basel); Journal Volume: 11; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 1996-1073
Publisher:
MDPI AG
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
16 TIDAL AND WAVE POWER; wave energy converter; design; survival; extreme conditions

Citation Formats

Coe, Ryan G., Yu, Yi-Hsiang, and van Rij, Jennifer. A Survey of WEC Reliability, Survival and Design Practices. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3390/en11010004.
Coe, Ryan G., Yu, Yi-Hsiang, & van Rij, Jennifer. A Survey of WEC Reliability, Survival and Design Practices. United States. doi:10.3390/en11010004.
Coe, Ryan G., Yu, Yi-Hsiang, and van Rij, Jennifer. 2017. "A Survey of WEC Reliability, Survival and Design Practices". United States. doi:10.3390/en11010004. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1419414.
@article{osti_1419414,
title = {A Survey of WEC Reliability, Survival and Design Practices},
author = {Coe, Ryan G. and Yu, Yi-Hsiang and van Rij, Jennifer},
abstractNote = {A wave energy converter must be designed to survive and function efficiently, often in highly energetic ocean environments. This represents a challenging engineering problem, comprising systematic failure mode analysis, environmental characterization, modeling, experimental testing, fatigue and extreme response analysis. While, when compared with other ocean systems such as ships and offshore platforms, there is relatively little experience in wave energy converter design, a great deal of recent work has been done within these various areas. Here, this article summarizes the general stages and workflow for wave energy converter design, relying on supporting articles to provide insight. By surveying published work on wave energy converter survival and design response analyses, this paper seeks to provide the reader with an understanding of the different components of this process and the range of methodologies that can be brought to bear. In this way, the reader is provided with a large set of tools to perform design response analyses on wave energy converters.},
doi = {10.3390/en11010004},
journal = {Energies (Basel)},
number = 1,
volume = 11,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Save / Share:
  • A questionnaire about operating, maintenance, and spare parts practices and station performance was sent to all HVDC converter stations worldwide. This survey is sponsored by IEEE Working Groups 15.05.08, Economics and Operating Strategies, and I7, Reliability of HVDC Converter Stations. Responses from 38 stations are analyzed, and information bout the most popular practices is reported. One important conclusion is that energy contracts, ac system constraints, and dedicated generation frequency have strong influences on the operation and maintenance practices of HVDC stations. A search is made for correlations between the operating, maintenance, and spare parts practices, including spending, and the stations`more » performance and availability. No conclusions about the most cost-effective practices can be made. The results are compared with those of a study published in 1992 which covered a few of the same topics.« less
  • Human factors engineering is an interdisciplinary speciality concerned with influencing the design of equipment systems, facilities, and operational environments to promote safe, efficient, and reliable operator performance. This emphasis has been applied to most military and space systems in the past 30 y. A review of five nuclear power-plant control rooms, reported in the November-December 1977 issue of Nuclear Safety, revealed that human factors principles of design have generally not been incorporated in present-generation control rooms. This article summarizes the findings of a survey of 20 control-board designers from a mix of nuclear steam-supply system and architect-engineering firms. The interviewsmore » with these designers probed design methods currently used in developing control rooms. From these data it was concluded that there is currently no consistent, formal, uniform concern for the human factors aspects of control-room design on the part of the design organizations, the utilities, or the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Although all the parties involved are concerned with human factors issues, this responsibility is not focused, and human factors yardsticks, or design standards, specific to power plants have not been evolved and applied in the development and verification of control-room designs from the standpoint of the man-machine interface.« less
  • Transformer reliability is not a function of loading in a majority of utility situations. Transformer loading problems are generally the result of either the designer not understanding the load conditions and environment or the operator not operating the transformer within the proper design constraints. A corporate engineering advisor describes transformer reliability in terms of common folklore, then makes computer simulation comparisons of five transformers made between 1942 and 1982 to illustrate various methods of determining optimum loading. 1 table.
  • The Regional Electric Reliability Councils have coordinated their efforts to plan, construct, and operate their power supply systems in order to provide more reliable and economical service. A status report covers: load-shedding programs, emergency power and shutdown facilities, restarting generating units, availability of continuous power, procedures for system disturbance and maintenance, relay networks, and operating reserve policy. An overall summary is followed by summaries for each of the nine regions. In spite of variations in procedures and complexities, the regional reports indicate efforts to achieve a coordinated reliability. (DCK)
  • This paper presents selected result from a recently completed research project for the Electric Power Research Institute. One component of the project was intended to develop and test methodologies for gathering data on how utility customers value power system service reliability, as measured by either the cost of outages or the willingness to pay for reliability. Another component of this project involved a survey of current and emerging reliability planning practices in the North American utility industry, especially regarding interest in value-based reliability planning. The paper highlights the results of the survey, including the survey design and methodology. It alsomore » briefly discusses potential applications of interruption costs in generation and composite system reliability planning.« less