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Title: Arm-in-Arm Response Regulator Dimers Promote Intermolecular Signal Transduction

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. (UW)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE - OTHERNIHNIGMS
OSTI Identifier:
1419049
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Bacteriol.; Journal Volume: 198; Journal Issue: (8) ; 04, 2016
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Baker, Anna W., Satyshur, Kenneth A., Morales, Neydis Moreno, and Forest, Katrina T. Arm-in-Arm Response Regulator Dimers Promote Intermolecular Signal Transduction. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1128/JB.00872-15.
Baker, Anna W., Satyshur, Kenneth A., Morales, Neydis Moreno, & Forest, Katrina T. Arm-in-Arm Response Regulator Dimers Promote Intermolecular Signal Transduction. United States. doi:10.1128/JB.00872-15.
Baker, Anna W., Satyshur, Kenneth A., Morales, Neydis Moreno, and Forest, Katrina T. 2018. "Arm-in-Arm Response Regulator Dimers Promote Intermolecular Signal Transduction". United States. doi:10.1128/JB.00872-15.
@article{osti_1419049,
title = {Arm-in-Arm Response Regulator Dimers Promote Intermolecular Signal Transduction},
author = {Baker, Anna W. and Satyshur, Kenneth A. and Morales, Neydis Moreno and Forest, Katrina T.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1128/JB.00872-15},
journal = {J. Bacteriol.},
number = (8) ; 04, 2016,
volume = 198,
place = {United States},
year = 2018,
month = 1
}
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