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Title: Arm-in-Arm Response Regulator Dimers Promote Intermolecular Signal Transduction

Abstract

ABSTRACT Bacteriophytochrome photoreceptors (BphPs) and their cognate response regulators make up two-component signal transduction systems which direct bacteria to mount phenotypic responses to changes in environmental light quality. Most of these systems utilize single-domain response regulators to transduce signals through unknown pathways and mechanisms. Here we describe the photocycle and autophosphorylation kinetics of RtBphP1, a red light-regulated histidine kinase from the desert bacteriumRamlibacter tataouinensis. RtBphP1 undergoes red to far-red photoconversion with rapid thermal reversion to the dark state. RtBphP1 is autophosphorylated in the dark; this activity is inhibited under red light. The RtBphP1 cognate response regulator, theR. tataouinensisbacteriophytochrome response regulator (RtBRR), and a homolog, AtBRR fromAgrobacterium tumefaciens, crystallize unexpectedly as arm-in-arm dimers, reliant on a conserved hydrophobic motif, hFWAhL (where h is a hydrophobic M, V, L, or I residue). RtBRR and AtBRR dimerize distinctly from four structurally characterized phytochrome response regulators found in photosynthetic organisms and from all other receiver domain homodimers in the Protein Data Bank. A unique cacodylate-zinc-histidine tag metal organic framework yielded single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phases and may be of general interest. Examination of the effect of the BRR stoichiometry on signal transduction showed that phosphorylated RtBRR is accumulated more efficiently than the engineered monomeric RtBRRmore » (RtBRR mon) in phosphotransfer reactions. Thus, we conclude that arm-in-arm dimers are a relevant signaling intermediate in this class of two-component regulatory systems. IMPORTANCEBphP histidine kinases and their cognate response regulators comprise widespread red light-sensing two-component systems. Much work on BphPs has focused on structural understanding of light sensing and on enhancing the natural infrared fluorescence of these proteins, rather than on signal transduction or the resultant phenotypes. To begin to address this knowledge gap, we solved the crystal structures of two single-domain response regulators encoded by a region immediately downstream of that encoding BphPs. We observed a previously unknown arm-in-arm dimer linkage. Monomerization via deletion of the C-terminal dimerization motif had an inhibitory effect on net response regulator phosphorylation, underlining the importance of these unusual dimers for signal transduction.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE - OTHERNIHNIGMS
OSTI Identifier:
1419049
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Bacteriology; Journal Volume: 198; Journal Issue: 8
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Baker, Anna W., Satyshur, Kenneth A., Moreno Morales, Neydis, Forest, Katrina T., and Stock, A. M. Arm-in-Arm Response Regulator Dimers Promote Intermolecular Signal Transduction. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1128/JB.00872-15.
Baker, Anna W., Satyshur, Kenneth A., Moreno Morales, Neydis, Forest, Katrina T., & Stock, A. M. Arm-in-Arm Response Regulator Dimers Promote Intermolecular Signal Transduction. United States. doi:10.1128/JB.00872-15.
Baker, Anna W., Satyshur, Kenneth A., Moreno Morales, Neydis, Forest, Katrina T., and Stock, A. M. Mon . "Arm-in-Arm Response Regulator Dimers Promote Intermolecular Signal Transduction". United States. doi:10.1128/JB.00872-15.
@article{osti_1419049,
title = {Arm-in-Arm Response Regulator Dimers Promote Intermolecular Signal Transduction},
author = {Baker, Anna W. and Satyshur, Kenneth A. and Moreno Morales, Neydis and Forest, Katrina T. and Stock, A. M.},
abstractNote = {ABSTRACT Bacteriophytochrome photoreceptors (BphPs) and their cognate response regulators make up two-component signal transduction systems which direct bacteria to mount phenotypic responses to changes in environmental light quality. Most of these systems utilize single-domain response regulators to transduce signals through unknown pathways and mechanisms. Here we describe the photocycle and autophosphorylation kinetics of RtBphP1, a red light-regulated histidine kinase from the desert bacteriumRamlibacter tataouinensis. RtBphP1 undergoes red to far-red photoconversion with rapid thermal reversion to the dark state. RtBphP1 is autophosphorylated in the dark; this activity is inhibited under red light. The RtBphP1 cognate response regulator, theR. tataouinensisbacteriophytochrome response regulator (RtBRR), and a homolog, AtBRR fromAgrobacterium tumefaciens, crystallize unexpectedly as arm-in-arm dimers, reliant on a conserved hydrophobic motif, hFWAhL (where h is a hydrophobic M, V, L, or I residue). RtBRR and AtBRR dimerize distinctly from four structurally characterized phytochrome response regulators found in photosynthetic organisms and from all other receiver domain homodimers in the Protein Data Bank. A unique cacodylate-zinc-histidine tag metal organic framework yielded single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phases and may be of general interest. Examination of the effect of the BRR stoichiometry on signal transduction showed that phosphorylated RtBRR is accumulated more efficiently than the engineered monomeric RtBRR (RtBRRmon) in phosphotransfer reactions. Thus, we conclude that arm-in-arm dimers are a relevant signaling intermediate in this class of two-component regulatory systems. IMPORTANCEBphP histidine kinases and their cognate response regulators comprise widespread red light-sensing two-component systems. Much work on BphPs has focused on structural understanding of light sensing and on enhancing the natural infrared fluorescence of these proteins, rather than on signal transduction or the resultant phenotypes. To begin to address this knowledge gap, we solved the crystal structures of two single-domain response regulators encoded by a region immediately downstream of that encoding BphPs. We observed a previously unknown arm-in-arm dimer linkage. Monomerization via deletion of the C-terminal dimerization motif had an inhibitory effect on net response regulator phosphorylation, underlining the importance of these unusual dimers for signal transduction.},
doi = {10.1128/JB.00872-15},
journal = {Journal of Bacteriology},
number = 8,
volume = 198,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2016},
month = {Mon Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2016}
}