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Title: Impacts of Electrification of Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States, 2010 - 2017

Abstract

This report examines the sales of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) in the United States from 2010 to 2017, exploring vehicle sales, electricity consumption, petroleum reduction, and battery production, among other factors. Over 750,000 PEVs have been sold, driving nearly 16 billion miles on electricity, thereby reducing gasoline consumption by 0.1% in 2016 and 600 million gallons cumulatively through 2017, while using over 5 terawatt-hours of electricity. Over 23 gigawatt-hours of battery capacity has been placed in vehicles, and 98% of this is still on the road, assuming typical scrappage rates.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V)
OSTI Identifier:
1418278
Report Number(s):
ANL/ESD-18/1
141595
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION

Citation Formats

Gohlke, David, and Zhou, Yan. Impacts of Electrification of Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States, 2010 - 2017. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1418278.
Gohlke, David, & Zhou, Yan. Impacts of Electrification of Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States, 2010 - 2017. United States. doi:10.2172/1418278.
Gohlke, David, and Zhou, Yan. Thu . "Impacts of Electrification of Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States, 2010 - 2017". United States. doi:10.2172/1418278. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1418278.
@article{osti_1418278,
title = {Impacts of Electrification of Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States, 2010 - 2017},
author = {Gohlke, David and Zhou, Yan},
abstractNote = {This report examines the sales of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) in the United States from 2010 to 2017, exploring vehicle sales, electricity consumption, petroleum reduction, and battery production, among other factors. Over 750,000 PEVs have been sold, driving nearly 16 billion miles on electricity, thereby reducing gasoline consumption by 0.1% in 2016 and 600 million gallons cumulatively through 2017, while using over 5 terawatt-hours of electricity. Over 23 gigawatt-hours of battery capacity has been placed in vehicles, and 98% of this is still on the road, assuming typical scrappage rates.},
doi = {10.2172/1418278},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 25 00:00:00 EST 2018},
month = {Thu Jan 25 00:00:00 EST 2018}
}

Technical Report:

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