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Title: FY17 ISCR Scholar End-of-Assignment Report - Robbie Sadre

Abstract

Throughout this internship assignment, I did various tasks that contributed towards the starting of the SASEDS (Safe Active Scanning for Energy Delivery Systems) and CES-21 (California Energy Systems for the 21st Century) projects in the SKYFALL laboratory. The goal of the SKYFALL laboratory is to perform modeling and simulation verification of transmission power system devices, while integrating with high-performance computing. The first thing I needed to do was acquire official Online LabVIEW training from National Instruments. Through these online tutorial modules, I learned the basics of LabVIEW, gaining experience in connecting to NI devices through the DAQmx API as well as LabVIEW basic programming techniques (structures, loops, state machines, front panel GUI design etc).

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1414368
Report Number(s):
LLNL-TR-742943
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION

Citation Formats

Sadre, R. FY17 ISCR Scholar End-of-Assignment Report - Robbie Sadre. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1414368.
Sadre, R. FY17 ISCR Scholar End-of-Assignment Report - Robbie Sadre. United States. doi:10.2172/1414368.
Sadre, R. 2017. "FY17 ISCR Scholar End-of-Assignment Report - Robbie Sadre". United States. doi:10.2172/1414368. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1414368.
@article{osti_1414368,
title = {FY17 ISCR Scholar End-of-Assignment Report - Robbie Sadre},
author = {Sadre, R.},
abstractNote = {Throughout this internship assignment, I did various tasks that contributed towards the starting of the SASEDS (Safe Active Scanning for Energy Delivery Systems) and CES-21 (California Energy Systems for the 21st Century) projects in the SKYFALL laboratory. The goal of the SKYFALL laboratory is to perform modeling and simulation verification of transmission power system devices, while integrating with high-performance computing. The first thing I needed to do was acquire official Online LabVIEW training from National Instruments. Through these online tutorial modules, I learned the basics of LabVIEW, gaining experience in connecting to NI devices through the DAQmx API as well as LabVIEW basic programming techniques (structures, loops, state machines, front panel GUI design etc).},
doi = {10.2172/1414368},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Technical Report:

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  • Advances in scientific computing research have never been more vital to the core missions of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory than they are today. These advances are evolving so rapidly, and over such a broad front of computational science, that to remain on the leading edge, the Laboratory must collaborate with many academic centers of excellence. In FY 1998, ISCR dramatically expanded its interactions with academia through collaborations, visiting faculty, guests and a seminar series. The pages of this annual report summarize the activities of the 63 faculty members and 34 students who participated in ISCR collaborative activities during FY 1998.more » The 1998 ISCR call for proposals issued by the University Collaborative Research Program (UCRP) resulted in eight awards made by the University of California Office of the President to research teams at UC San Diego, UC Davis, UC Los Angeles, and UC Berkeley. These projects are noted. ISCR is now part of the Laboratory's Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC). Many CASC scientists participate actively in ISCR University collaborations, as noted. The eight collaborations shown represent innovative research efforts supported by ISCR in FY 1998. Abstracts discussing each of these collaborations begin on page 79. The Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) established Academic Strategic Alliances Program (ASAP) centers located at: Stanford University; California Institute of Technology; University of Chicago; University of Utah, Salt Lake; and University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. The ASCI Alliances strategy was established to enhance overall ASCI goals by establishing technical interactions between the Department of Energy, Defense Programs laboratories (Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, and Sandia National Laboratories), and leading-edge research-and-development universities in the United States. ISCR has partnered with the LLNL ASCI Program Office to facilitate these collaborations. In FY 1998, ISCR hosted ASCI Alliances student guests who visited LLNL for collaborations during the summer months.« less
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