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Title: Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB) Users’ Manual and Technical Documentation

Abstract

The Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB) calculates carbon emissions from land use change (LUC) for four different ethanol production pathways including corn grain ethanol and cellulosic ethanol from corn stover, Miscanthus, and switchgrass, and a soy biodiesel pathway. This document discusses the version of CCLUB released September 30, 2017 which includes five ethanol LUC scenarios and four soy biodiesel LUC scenarios.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [1]
  1. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
  2. Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)
  3. International Food Policy Research Inst., Washington, DC (United States)
  4. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) - Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO)
OSTI Identifier:
1414292
Report Number(s):
ANL-/ESD/12-5 Rev.4
139768
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS

Citation Formats

Dunn, Jennifer B., Qin, Zhangcai, Mueller, Steffen, Kwon, Ho-young, Wander, Michelle M., and Wang, Michael. Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB) Users’ Manual and Technical Documentation. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1414292.
Dunn, Jennifer B., Qin, Zhangcai, Mueller, Steffen, Kwon, Ho-young, Wander, Michelle M., & Wang, Michael. Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB) Users’ Manual and Technical Documentation. United States. doi:10.2172/1414292.
Dunn, Jennifer B., Qin, Zhangcai, Mueller, Steffen, Kwon, Ho-young, Wander, Michelle M., and Wang, Michael. 2017. "Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB) Users’ Manual and Technical Documentation". United States. doi:10.2172/1414292. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1414292.
@article{osti_1414292,
title = {Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB) Users’ Manual and Technical Documentation},
author = {Dunn, Jennifer B. and Qin, Zhangcai and Mueller, Steffen and Kwon, Ho-young and Wander, Michelle M. and Wang, Michael},
abstractNote = {The Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB) calculates carbon emissions from land use change (LUC) for four different ethanol production pathways including corn grain ethanol and cellulosic ethanol from corn stover, Miscanthus, and switchgrass, and a soy biodiesel pathway. This document discusses the version of CCLUB released September 30, 2017 which includes five ethanol LUC scenarios and four soy biodiesel LUC scenarios.},
doi = {10.2172/1414292},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Technical Report:

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  • The Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB) calculates carbon emissions from land use change (LUC) for four different ethanol production pathways including corn grain ethanol and cellulosic ethanol from corn stover, miscanthus, and switchgrass. This document discusses the version of CCLUB released May 31, 2012 which includes corn, as did the previous CCLUB version, and three cellulosic feedstocks: corn stover, miscanthus, and switchgrass. CCLUB calculations are based upon two data sets: land change areas and above- and below-ground carbon content. Table 1 identifies where these data are stored and used within the CCLUB model, which ismore » built in MS Excel. Land change area data is from Purdue University's Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) model, a computable general equilibrium (CGE) economic model. Section 2 describes the GTAP data CCLUB uses and how these data were modified to reflect shrubland transitions. Feedstock- and spatially-explicit below-ground carbon content data for the United States were generated with a surrogate model for CENTURY's soil organic carbon sub-model (Kwon and Hudson 2010) as described in Section 3. CENTURY is a soil organic matter model developed by Parton et al. (1987). The previous CCLUB version used more coarse domestic carbon emission factors. Above-ground non-soil carbon content data for forest ecosystems was sourced from the USDA/NCIAS Carbon Online Estimator (COLE) as explained in Section 4. We discuss emission factors used for calculation of international greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Section 5. Temporal issues associated with modeling LUC emissions are the topic of Section 6. Finally, in Section 7 we provide a step-by-step guide to using CCLUB and obtaining results.« less
  • The Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB) calculates carbon emissions from land use change (LUC) for four different ethanol production pathways including corn grain ethanol and cellulosic ethanol from corn stover, Miscanthus, and switchgrass. This document discusses the version of CCLUB released September 30, 2014 which includes corn and three cellulosic feedstocks: corn stover, Miscanthus, and switchgrass.
  • Themore » $$\underline{C}$$arbon $$\underline{C}$$alculator for $$\underline{L}$$and $$\underline{U}$$se Change from $$\underline{B}$$iofuels Production (CCLUB) calculates carbon emissions from land use change (LUC) for four different ethanol production pathways including corn grain ethanol and cellulosic ethanol from corn stover, Miscanthus, and switchgrass. This document discusses the version of CCLUB released September 30, 2014 which includes corn and three cellulosic feedstocks: corn stover, Miscanthus, and switchgrass.« less
  • One of the major problems that software library writers face, particularly in a research environment, is the generation of documentation. Producing good, professional-quality documentation is tedious and time consuming. Often, no documentation is produced. For many users, however, much of the need for documentation may be satisfied by a brief description of the purpose and use of the routines and their arguments. Even for more complete, hand-generated documentation, this information provides a convenient starting point. We describe here a tool that may be used to generate documentation about programs written in the C language. It uses a structured comment conventionmore » that preserves the original C source code and does not require any additional files. The markup language is designed to be an almost invisible structured comment in the C source code, retaining readability in the original source. Documentation in a form suitable for the Unix man program (nroff), LaTeX, and the World Wide Web can be produced.« less