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Title: Imaging mass spectrometry tackles interfacial challenges in electrochemistry

Abstract

Electrochemistry has played a significant role in many research fields. Owing to its sensitivity and selectivity, in situ electroanalysis has been widely used as a fast and economical means for achieving outstanding results. Although many spectroscopic techniques have been used in electrochemistry, the challenges to capture short-lived intermediate species as a result of electron transfer in the buried solid electrode and electrolyte solution interface remains a grand challenge. In situ imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) recently has been extended to capture transient species in electrochemistry. This review intends to summarize newest development of IMS and its applications in advancing fundamental electrochemistry.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1411921
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-127954
Journal ID: ISSN 2451-9103
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Current Opinion in Electrochemistry; Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; Imaging mass spectrometry; solid-liquid interface; dynamic imaging; microfluidic; electron transfer

Citation Formats

Yu, Xiao-Ying. Imaging mass spectrometry tackles interfacial challenges in electrochemistry. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.coelec.2017.10.025.
Yu, Xiao-Ying. Imaging mass spectrometry tackles interfacial challenges in electrochemistry. United States. doi:10.1016/j.coelec.2017.10.025.
Yu, Xiao-Ying. 2017. "Imaging mass spectrometry tackles interfacial challenges in electrochemistry". United States. doi:10.1016/j.coelec.2017.10.025.
@article{osti_1411921,
title = {Imaging mass spectrometry tackles interfacial challenges in electrochemistry},
author = {Yu, Xiao-Ying},
abstractNote = {Electrochemistry has played a significant role in many research fields. Owing to its sensitivity and selectivity, in situ electroanalysis has been widely used as a fast and economical means for achieving outstanding results. Although many spectroscopic techniques have been used in electrochemistry, the challenges to capture short-lived intermediate species as a result of electron transfer in the buried solid electrode and electrolyte solution interface remains a grand challenge. In situ imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) recently has been extended to capture transient species in electrochemistry. This review intends to summarize newest development of IMS and its applications in advancing fundamental electrochemistry.},
doi = {10.1016/j.coelec.2017.10.025},
journal = {Current Opinion in Electrochemistry},
number = 1,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}
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