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Title: Experimental investigation of the influence of freestream turbulence on an anti-vortex film cooling hole

Authors:
; ; ; ORCiD logo;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1411809
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Experimental Thermal and Fluid Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 81; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-12-07 12:16:09; Journal ID: ISSN 0894-1777
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Hayes, Stephen A., Nix, Andrew C., Nestor, Christopher M., Billups, David T., and Haught, Shane M.. Experimental investigation of the influence of freestream turbulence on an anti-vortex film cooling hole. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.expthermflusci.2016.10.025.
Hayes, Stephen A., Nix, Andrew C., Nestor, Christopher M., Billups, David T., & Haught, Shane M.. Experimental investigation of the influence of freestream turbulence on an anti-vortex film cooling hole. United States. doi:10.1016/j.expthermflusci.2016.10.025.
Hayes, Stephen A., Nix, Andrew C., Nestor, Christopher M., Billups, David T., and Haught, Shane M.. Wed . "Experimental investigation of the influence of freestream turbulence on an anti-vortex film cooling hole". United States. doi:10.1016/j.expthermflusci.2016.10.025.
@article{osti_1411809,
title = {Experimental investigation of the influence of freestream turbulence on an anti-vortex film cooling hole},
author = {Hayes, Stephen A. and Nix, Andrew C. and Nestor, Christopher M. and Billups, David T. and Haught, Shane M.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.expthermflusci.2016.10.025},
journal = {Experimental Thermal and Fluid Science},
number = C,
volume = 81,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.expthermflusci.2016.10.025

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  • Coolant was injected from three holes on the center line of the suction surface of a gas turbine blade. The density and mass flow ratios were varied in the ranges of 1.0 {approximately} 3.0 and 0.2 {approximately} 0.9, respectively. Film-cooling effectiveness on the center line is mainly governed by the momentum ratio, and the optimum momentum ratio is about 0.05 {approximately} 0.10. In this paper, an empirical relation for film-cooling effectiveness on the center line is presented as a function of only the dimensionless streamwise distance from the injection hole and the momentum ratio. The maximum and mean errors ofmore » this relation are 55.8 percent and 8.5 percent, respectively. The normalized dimensionless spanwise distribution of the film-cooling effectiveness agreed well with the Gaussian error function. By using the above results and the principle of superposition, the distribution of full coverage film-cooling effectivness can be predicted on the suction surface under the optimum condition.« less
  • Coolant was injected from three holes on the center line of the pressure surface of a gas turbine blade. The density ratio and mass flow ratio covered the ranges of 1.0 {approximately} 3.0 and 0.1 {approximately} 1.5, respectively. The film cooling effectiveness on the center line was mainly governed by the momentum ratio, and the optimum momentum ratio is about 0.01. An empirical formula for the film cooling effectiveness on the center line is presented as a function of the dimensionless streamwise distance form the injection hole and the momentum ratio. The maximum and mean errors of this equation aremore » 26.8 percent and 9.2 percent, respectively. The normalized dimensionless spanwise distribution of the film cooling effectiveness agreed well with the Gaussian error function. By using the above results and the principle of superposition, one can predict the distribution of full coverage film cooling effectiveness on the pressure surface under optimum conditions.« less
  • This article compares the performance of five different turbulence models in predicting the flow field and heat transfer phenomena created by the jet-crossflow interactions for film cooling applications. The models used to simulate the fine-scale turbulence are low-Reynolds-number versions of the {kappa}-{epsilon} and {kappa}-{omega} models, the algebraic Baldwin-Lomax model, and also a relaxation eddy viscosity model. The time-dependent, density-weighted Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the compressible form of two-equation models are solved based on an explicit finite-volume formulation. The computed flow field and surface temperature distributions along with the turbulence quantities are presented to illustrate the flow physics involved in themore » present problem. Considering both the predicted surface temperature distribution and the relaxation behavior of the velocity, low-Reynolds-number versions of the {kappa}-{epsilon} model seem to perform better compared to others.« less
  • A four-vane subsonic cascade was used to investigate the influence of film injection on vane heat transfer distributions in the presence of high turbulence. The influence of high turbulence on vane film cooling effectiveness and boundary layer development was also examined in part 2 of this paper. A high-level, large-scale inlet turbulence was generated for this study with a mock combustor (12 percent) and was used to contrast results with a low level (1 percent) of inlet turbulence. The three geometries chosen to study in this investigation were one row and two staggered rows of downstream cooling on both themore » suction and pressure surfaces in addition to a showerhead array. Film cooling was found to have only a moderate influence on the heat transfer coefficients downstream from arrays on the suction surface where the boundary layer was turbulent. However, film cooling was found to have a substantial influence on heat transfer downstream from arrays in laminar regions of the vane such as the pressure surface, the stagnation region, and the near-suction surface. Generally, heat transfer augmentation was found to scale on velocity ratio. In relative terms, the augmentation in the laminar regions for the low turbulence case was found to be higher than the augmentation for the high-turbulence case. The absolute levels of heat transfer were always found to be the highest for the high turbulence case.« less
  • A four-vane subsonic cascade was used to investigate the influence of turbulence on vane film cooling distributions. The influence of film injection on vane heat transfer distributions in the presence of high turbulence was examined in part 1 of this paper. Vane effectiveness distributions were documented in the presence of a low level of turbulence (1 percent) and were used to contrast results taken at a high level (12 percent) of large-scale turbulence. All data were taken at a density ratio of about 1. The three geometries chosen to study included one row and two staggered rows of downstream filmmore » cooling on both the suction and pressure surfaces as well as a showerhead array. Turbulence was found to have a moderate influence on one and two rows of suction surface film cooling but had a dramatic influence on pressure surface film cooling, particularly at the lower velocity ratios. The strong pressure gradients on the pressure surface of the vane were also found to alter film cooling distributions substantially. At lower velocity ratios, effectiveness distributions for two staggered rows of holes could be predicted well using data from one row superposed. At higher velocity ratios the two staggered rows produced significantly higher levels of effectiveness than values estimated from single row data superposed. Turbulence was also found to reduce effectiveness levels produced by showerhead film cooling substantially.« less