skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: The value of demand response in Florida

Abstract

Many electrical loads may be operated flexibly to provide grid services, including peaking capacity, reserves, and load shifting. The authors model 14 demand end uses in Florida and analyze their operational impacts and overall value for a wide range of solar penetrations and grid flexibility options. They find demand response is able to reduce production costs, reduce the number of low-load hours for traditional generators, reduce starting of gas generators, and reduce curtailment.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
  2. Stanford Univ., CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1411321
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-6A20-69078
Journal ID: ISSN 1040-6190
Grant/Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Electricity Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 30; Journal Issue: 9; Journal ID: ISSN 1040-6190
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; demand response; power systems; solar photovoltaics; renewable integration

Citation Formats

Stoll, Brady, Buechler, Elizabeth, and Hale, Elaine. The value of demand response in Florida. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.tej.2017.10.004.
Stoll, Brady, Buechler, Elizabeth, & Hale, Elaine. The value of demand response in Florida. United States. doi:10.1016/j.tej.2017.10.004.
Stoll, Brady, Buechler, Elizabeth, and Hale, Elaine. Fri . "The value of demand response in Florida". United States. doi:10.1016/j.tej.2017.10.004.
@article{osti_1411321,
title = {The value of demand response in Florida},
author = {Stoll, Brady and Buechler, Elizabeth and Hale, Elaine},
abstractNote = {Many electrical loads may be operated flexibly to provide grid services, including peaking capacity, reserves, and load shifting. The authors model 14 demand end uses in Florida and analyze their operational impacts and overall value for a wide range of solar penetrations and grid flexibility options. They find demand response is able to reduce production costs, reduce the number of low-load hours for traditional generators, reduce starting of gas generators, and reduce curtailment.},
doi = {10.1016/j.tej.2017.10.004},
journal = {Electricity Journal},
number = 9,
volume = 30,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Nov 10 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Fri Nov 10 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on November 10, 2018
Publisher's Version of Record

Save / Share:
  • Utilities have embraced demand-side management (DSM) for sound business reasons. After all, it is more expensive than ever to build power stations, yet the demands for electricity that accompany economic and population growth must be met. Many utilities, including Ontario Hydro, have concluded that the most economically viable way to being to provide for new customers is to help existing customers become more efficient. This has been made possible by rapidly changing technology that provides society with instruments that offer the same level of service while using less energy. Use of these technologies has been expedited in some jurisdictions bymore » regulators who are rewriting the rules so that progressive, customer-oriented utilities can earn a return on investments to help customers increase efficiency. As DSM has evolved to become part of the core of the utility business -- joining delivery, planning, and engineering -- ways to promote it have become a greater part of utility activity. It is increasingly important for utilities to increase the prevalence of DSM measures. Customer value has been advocated by many as the way to achieve this goal. Ontario Hydro has concluded that a focus on the customer must go beyond marketing DSM. Instead, this focus must drive a utility's activities as the industry moves from supplying energy to supplying energy services. DSM measures cannot be effective without broad public support because they require the participation of so many people. Electrical supply is generated at a small number of large sites, while improvements in efficiency must occur at countless thousands of sites. In fact, increasing regulatory and political intervention in the utility business and the growing number of options presented to customers have created an increasing need for broad public support for all utility activities. But this necessary public support will be forthcoming only if the public believes it is getting the best possible value.« less
  • This paper describes the methodology used to develop the simulation model and the application of the simulation model to study the economic benefits and impacts on distribution feeder load shapes when applying different control strategies to the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems.
  • Phenotypic variation in calorific value among melaleuca samples from natural stands in South Florida is described. One hundred trees were selected from ten 5 m x 5 m test plots distributed evenly in 2 geographic areas - Lee County and Dade County. In general, no geographic changes in calorific value, for either wood and bark, were evident. Differences among the plot averages were significant. Both calorific values of wood and bark fluctuated greatly among trees within plots. The calorific value did not seem to relate with the size of tree. Implications for tree improvement are discussed.
  • Melaleuca quinquenervia trees were selected from 10 plots in natural stands in 2 areas on the Gulf and Atlantic coasts of Florida. Stem discs were taken at b.h., and wood and bark samples dried and calorific values determined separately by bomb calorimetry. Overall, there was n.s.d. between samples from the 2 areas, but differences were significant among plots and among trees within plots. There was no correlation between calorific value and tree size (d.b.h.). Average calorific values were 4396 cal/g for wood and 6173 cal/g for bark. Implications for genetic improvement are discussed.
  • Paying customers to refrain from purchasing products they want seems to run counter to the normal operation of markets. Demand response should be interpreted not as a supply-side resource but as a secondary market that attempts to correct the misallocation of electricity among electric users caused by regulated average rate tariffs. In a world with costless metering, the DR solution results in inefficiency as measured by deadweight losses. (author)