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Title: Bifiguratus adelaidae, gen. et sp. nov., a new member of Mucoromycotina in endophytic and soil-dwelling habitats

Abstract

Illumina amplicon sequencing of soil in a temperate pine forest in the southeastern United States detected an abundant, nitrogen (N)-responsive fungal genotype of unknown phylogenetic affiliation. Two isolates with ribosomal sequences consistent with that genotype were subsequently obtained. Examination of records in GenBank revealed that a genetically similar fungus had been isolated previously as an endophyte of moss in a pine forest in the southwestern United States. The three isolates were characterized using morphological, genomic, and multilocus molecular data (18S, internal transcribed spacer [ITS], and 28S rRNA sequences). Phylogenetic and maximum likelihood phylogenomic reconstructions revealed that the taxon represents a novel lineage in Mucoromycotina, only preceded by Calcarisporiella, the earliest diverging lineage in the subphylum. Sequences for the novel taxon are frequently detected in environmental sequencing studies, and it is currently part of UNITE’s dynamic list of most wanted fungi. The fungus is dimorphic, grows best at room temperature, and is associated with a wide variety of bacteria. In this paper, a new monotypic genus, Bifiguratus, is proposed, typified by Bifiguratus adelaidae.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [3]; ORCiD logo [4];  [5];  [6]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Western Illinois Univ., Macomb, IL (United States)
  2. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  3. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)
  4. Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)
  5. USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS), Peoria, IL (United States). National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research
  6. Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Western Illinois Univ., Macomb, IL (United States); Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS), Peoria, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23); National Science Foundation (NSF); National Inst. of Health (NIH) (United States); Western Illinois Univ. (United States); Dept. of Agriculture (USDA)
OSTI Identifier:
1409768
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-22326
Journal ID: ISSN 0027-5514
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396; DEB-0640996; DEB-0640956; DEB-1441715; DBI-1429826; S10-OD016290
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Mycologia
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 109; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 0027-5514
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; bryophyte; dimorphic; endophyte; environmental sampling; Mucoromycota; Pinaceae; soil

Citation Formats

Torres-Cruz, Terry J., Billingsley Tobias, Terri L., Almatruk, Maryam, Hesse, Cedar N., Kuske, Cheryl R., Desirò, Alessandro, Benucci, Gian Maria Niccolo, Bonito, Gregory, Stajich, Jason E., Dunlap, Christopher, Arnold, A. Elizabeth, and Porras-Alfaro, Andrea. Bifiguratus adelaidae, gen. et sp. nov., a new member of Mucoromycotina in endophytic and soil-dwelling habitats. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1080/00275514.2017.1364958.
Torres-Cruz, Terry J., Billingsley Tobias, Terri L., Almatruk, Maryam, Hesse, Cedar N., Kuske, Cheryl R., Desirò, Alessandro, Benucci, Gian Maria Niccolo, Bonito, Gregory, Stajich, Jason E., Dunlap, Christopher, Arnold, A. Elizabeth, & Porras-Alfaro, Andrea. Bifiguratus adelaidae, gen. et sp. nov., a new member of Mucoromycotina in endophytic and soil-dwelling habitats. United States. doi:10.1080/00275514.2017.1364958.
Torres-Cruz, Terry J., Billingsley Tobias, Terri L., Almatruk, Maryam, Hesse, Cedar N., Kuske, Cheryl R., Desirò, Alessandro, Benucci, Gian Maria Niccolo, Bonito, Gregory, Stajich, Jason E., Dunlap, Christopher, Arnold, A. Elizabeth, and Porras-Alfaro, Andrea. 2017. "Bifiguratus adelaidae, gen. et sp. nov., a new member of Mucoromycotina in endophytic and soil-dwelling habitats". United States. doi:10.1080/00275514.2017.1364958.
@article{osti_1409768,
title = {Bifiguratus adelaidae, gen. et sp. nov., a new member of Mucoromycotina in endophytic and soil-dwelling habitats},
author = {Torres-Cruz, Terry J. and Billingsley Tobias, Terri L. and Almatruk, Maryam and Hesse, Cedar N. and Kuske, Cheryl R. and Desirò, Alessandro and Benucci, Gian Maria Niccolo and Bonito, Gregory and Stajich, Jason E. and Dunlap, Christopher and Arnold, A. Elizabeth and Porras-Alfaro, Andrea},
abstractNote = {Illumina amplicon sequencing of soil in a temperate pine forest in the southeastern United States detected an abundant, nitrogen (N)-responsive fungal genotype of unknown phylogenetic affiliation. Two isolates with ribosomal sequences consistent with that genotype were subsequently obtained. Examination of records in GenBank revealed that a genetically similar fungus had been isolated previously as an endophyte of moss in a pine forest in the southwestern United States. The three isolates were characterized using morphological, genomic, and multilocus molecular data (18S, internal transcribed spacer [ITS], and 28S rRNA sequences). Phylogenetic and maximum likelihood phylogenomic reconstructions revealed that the taxon represents a novel lineage in Mucoromycotina, only preceded by Calcarisporiella, the earliest diverging lineage in the subphylum. Sequences for the novel taxon are frequently detected in environmental sequencing studies, and it is currently part of UNITE’s dynamic list of most wanted fungi. The fungus is dimorphic, grows best at room temperature, and is associated with a wide variety of bacteria. In this paper, a new monotypic genus, Bifiguratus, is proposed, typified by Bifiguratus adelaidae.},
doi = {10.1080/00275514.2017.1364958},
journal = {Mycologia},
number = 3,
volume = 109,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}

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