skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Identification and Characterization of Thermal Fluid Phenomena Associated with Selected Operating/Accident Scenarios in Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors

Abstract

Dominant phenomena are identified and characterized for the loss-of-forced-convection (LOFC) scenario, the depressurized loss-of-forced-convection (DLOFC) scenario, and the moisture ingress scenario with relief valves available scenario. These scenarios are considered for the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) baseline design—with both a prismatic core and a pebble-bed core. The objectives of this effort, described in the above paragraph, were achieved by following a methodology identified by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and recommended in their Regulatory Guide 1.203. The methodology employed is described. For the above scenarios, baseline phenomena identification and ranking tables (PIRTs) generated by a NRC-sponsored effort in 2008 for the LOFC and DLOFC scenarios and a baseline PIRT generated by a Department of Energy-sponsored effort in 2011 by their Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Moisture Ingress Assessment Committee were used to identify the dominant phenomena and existing levels-of-knowledge. Ten dominant phenomena (with only medium or low levels-of-knowledge) were identified for the LOFC and DLOFC scenarios including: (1) Inlet plenum stratification and plumes, (2) core coolant flow distribution, (3) radiant heat transfer from the top of the core to the upper vessel head, (4) reactor cavity air circulation and heat transfer, (5) reactor cavity cooling system behavior,more » (6) decay heat distributions, (7) core effective thermal conductivity, (8) molecular diffusion in air ingress DLOFC, (9) duct exchange flow, (10) phenomena that affect cavity gas composition for air-ingress. Five dominant phenomena, with high levels of knowledge, were identified for the moisture-ingress scenario with relief valves available including: (1) flow through break, (2) moisture level in the primary, (3) transport to moisture monitor, (4) moisture monitor instrument response, and (5) heat removal by shutdown cooling system. These phenomena are discussed and characterized. A listing of experiments—both completed and ongoing—is given with a view toward including data useful for further more detailed examination of the dominant phenomena listed in the previous paragraph. Note that only data for the LOFC and DLOFC scenarios are listed—since the moisture ingress scenario with relief valves available –have been identified as having adequate levels-of-knowledge by the PIRT committee. Finally, a preliminary computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculation of inlet plenum stratification and plumes is described. Techniques employed for this calculation are typical for preliminary scoping calculations performed to validate numeric tools.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
  2. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1408770
Report Number(s):
INL/EXT-17-43218
DOE Contract Number:  
AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; computational fluid dynamics; large break loss-of-coolant; Pebble Bed Modular Reactor; pressurized conduction cooling accident; reactor pressure vessel; reliminary Safety Information Document

Citation Formats

Schultz, Richard R., Gougar, Hans, Vegendla, Prasad, Obabko, Aleksandr, and Thomas, Justin. Identification and Characterization of Thermal Fluid Phenomena Associated with Selected Operating/Accident Scenarios in Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1408770.
Schultz, Richard R., Gougar, Hans, Vegendla, Prasad, Obabko, Aleksandr, & Thomas, Justin. Identification and Characterization of Thermal Fluid Phenomena Associated with Selected Operating/Accident Scenarios in Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors. United States. doi:10.2172/1408770.
Schultz, Richard R., Gougar, Hans, Vegendla, Prasad, Obabko, Aleksandr, and Thomas, Justin. Tue . "Identification and Characterization of Thermal Fluid Phenomena Associated with Selected Operating/Accident Scenarios in Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors". United States. doi:10.2172/1408770. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1408770.
@article{osti_1408770,
title = {Identification and Characterization of Thermal Fluid Phenomena Associated with Selected Operating/Accident Scenarios in Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors},
author = {Schultz, Richard R. and Gougar, Hans and Vegendla, Prasad and Obabko, Aleksandr and Thomas, Justin},
abstractNote = {Dominant phenomena are identified and characterized for the loss-of-forced-convection (LOFC) scenario, the depressurized loss-of-forced-convection (DLOFC) scenario, and the moisture ingress scenario with relief valves available scenario. These scenarios are considered for the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) baseline design—with both a prismatic core and a pebble-bed core. The objectives of this effort, described in the above paragraph, were achieved by following a methodology identified by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and recommended in their Regulatory Guide 1.203. The methodology employed is described. For the above scenarios, baseline phenomena identification and ranking tables (PIRTs) generated by a NRC-sponsored effort in 2008 for the LOFC and DLOFC scenarios and a baseline PIRT generated by a Department of Energy-sponsored effort in 2011 by their Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Moisture Ingress Assessment Committee were used to identify the dominant phenomena and existing levels-of-knowledge. Ten dominant phenomena (with only medium or low levels-of-knowledge) were identified for the LOFC and DLOFC scenarios including: (1) Inlet plenum stratification and plumes, (2) core coolant flow distribution, (3) radiant heat transfer from the top of the core to the upper vessel head, (4) reactor cavity air circulation and heat transfer, (5) reactor cavity cooling system behavior, (6) decay heat distributions, (7) core effective thermal conductivity, (8) molecular diffusion in air ingress DLOFC, (9) duct exchange flow, (10) phenomena that affect cavity gas composition for air-ingress. Five dominant phenomena, with high levels of knowledge, were identified for the moisture-ingress scenario with relief valves available including: (1) flow through break, (2) moisture level in the primary, (3) transport to moisture monitor, (4) moisture monitor instrument response, and (5) heat removal by shutdown cooling system. These phenomena are discussed and characterized. A listing of experiments—both completed and ongoing—is given with a view toward including data useful for further more detailed examination of the dominant phenomena listed in the previous paragraph. Note that only data for the LOFC and DLOFC scenarios are listed—since the moisture ingress scenario with relief valves available –have been identified as having adequate levels-of-knowledge by the PIRT committee. Finally, a preliminary computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculation of inlet plenum stratification and plumes is described. Techniques employed for this calculation are typical for preliminary scoping calculations performed to validate numeric tools.},
doi = {10.2172/1408770},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {9}
}