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Title: Fiber Based Seed Laser for CO 2 Ultrafast Laser Systems

Abstract

A compact and effective 10-micron femtosecond laser with pulse duration <500fs and repetition rate of >100Hz or smaller is desirable by DOE for seeding CO 2 ultrafast laser systems to improve the stability, reliability and efficiency in generating 10-micron laser from GW up to 100TW peak power, which is irreplaceable in driving an accelerator for particle beam generation due to the efficiency proportional to the square of the laser wavelength. Agiltron proposes a fiber based ultrafast 10-micron seed laser that can provide the required specifications and high performance. Its success will directly benefit DOE’s compact proton and ion sources. The innovative technology can be used for ultrafast laser generation over the whole mid-IR range, and speed up the development of mid-IR laser applications. Agiltron, Inc. has successfully completed all tasks and demonstrated the feasibility of a fiber based 10-micron ultrafast laser in Phase I of the Program. We built a mode-locked fiber laser that generated < 400fs ultrafast laser pulses and successfully controlled the repetition rate to be the required 100Hz. Using this mode-locked laser, we demonstrated the feasibility of parametric femtosecond laser generation based on frequency down conversion. The experimental results agree with our simulation results. The investigation resultsmore » of Phase I will be used to optimize the design of the laser system and build a fully functional prototype for delivery to the DOE in the Phase II program. The prototype development in Phase II program will be in the collaboration with Professor Chandrashekhar Joshi, the leader of UCLA Laser-Plasma group. Prof. Joshi discovered a new mechanism for generation of monoenergetic proton/ion beams: Shock Wave Acceleration in a near critical density plasma and demonstrated that high-energy proton beams using CO 2 laser driven collisionless shocks in a gas jet plasma, which opened an opportunity to develop a rather compact high-repetition rate ion source for medical and other applications which could be significantly cheaper than that based on RF acceleration. We propose an output energy >1 μJ, one order of magnitude higher than the DOE original requirement. The performance of the prototype will be tested at UCLA by directly seeding the CO 2 laser system driving an accelerator.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Agiltron, Inc., Woburn, MA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Agiltron, Inc., Woburn, MA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
Contributing Org.:
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)
OSTI Identifier:
1407426
Report Number(s):
DOE-AGIL-0011276
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0011276
Type / Phase:
SBIR (Phase II)
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; Accelerator; compact proton/ion sources; mode-locked fiber laser; CO2 ultrafast laser; frequency down conversion

Citation Formats

Chen, Yuchuan. Fiber Based Seed Laser for CO2 Ultrafast Laser Systems. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Chen, Yuchuan. Fiber Based Seed Laser for CO2 Ultrafast Laser Systems. United States.
Chen, Yuchuan. Wed . "Fiber Based Seed Laser for CO2 Ultrafast Laser Systems". United States.
@article{osti_1407426,
title = {Fiber Based Seed Laser for CO2 Ultrafast Laser Systems},
author = {Chen, Yuchuan},
abstractNote = {A compact and effective 10-micron femtosecond laser with pulse duration <500fs and repetition rate of >100Hz or smaller is desirable by DOE for seeding CO2 ultrafast laser systems to improve the stability, reliability and efficiency in generating 10-micron laser from GW up to 100TW peak power, which is irreplaceable in driving an accelerator for particle beam generation due to the efficiency proportional to the square of the laser wavelength. Agiltron proposes a fiber based ultrafast 10-micron seed laser that can provide the required specifications and high performance. Its success will directly benefit DOE’s compact proton and ion sources. The innovative technology can be used for ultrafast laser generation over the whole mid-IR range, and speed up the development of mid-IR laser applications. Agiltron, Inc. has successfully completed all tasks and demonstrated the feasibility of a fiber based 10-micron ultrafast laser in Phase I of the Program. We built a mode-locked fiber laser that generated < 400fs ultrafast laser pulses and successfully controlled the repetition rate to be the required 100Hz. Using this mode-locked laser, we demonstrated the feasibility of parametric femtosecond laser generation based on frequency down conversion. The experimental results agree with our simulation results. The investigation results of Phase I will be used to optimize the design of the laser system and build a fully functional prototype for delivery to the DOE in the Phase II program. The prototype development in Phase II program will be in the collaboration with Professor Chandrashekhar Joshi, the leader of UCLA Laser-Plasma group. Prof. Joshi discovered a new mechanism for generation of monoenergetic proton/ion beams: Shock Wave Acceleration in a near critical density plasma and demonstrated that high-energy proton beams using CO2 laser driven collisionless shocks in a gas jet plasma, which opened an opportunity to develop a rather compact high-repetition rate ion source for medical and other applications which could be significantly cheaper than that based on RF acceleration. We propose an output energy >1 μJ, one order of magnitude higher than the DOE original requirement. The performance of the prototype will be tested at UCLA by directly seeding the CO2 laser system driving an accelerator.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {10}
}

Technical Report:
This technical report may be released as soon as April 20, 2022
Other availability
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