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Title: Evaluation of a multi-scale WRF-CAM5 simulation during the 2010 East Asian Summer Monsoon

Abstract

The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) with the physics package of the Community Atmosphere Model Version 5 (CAM5) has been applied at multiple scales over Eastern China (EC) and the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) to evaluate how increased horizontal resolution with physics designed for a coarser resolution climate model impacts aerosols and clouds, and the resulting precipitation characteristics and performance during the 2010 East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM). Despite large underpredictions in surface aerosol concentrations and aerosol optical depth, there is good spatial agreement with surface observations of chemical predictions, and increasing spatial resolution tends to improve performance. Model bias and normalized root mean square values for precipitation predictions are relatively small, but there are significant differences when comparing modeled and observed probability density functions for precipitation in EC and YRD. Increasing model horizontal resolution tends to reduce model bias and error for precipitation predictions. The surface and column aerosol loading is maximized between about 32N and 42N in early to mid-May during the 2010 EASM, and then shifts north while decreasing in magnitude during July and August. Changing model resolution moderately changes the spatiotemporal relationships between aerosols, cloud properties, and precipitation during the EASM, thus demonstratingmore » the importance of model grid resolution in simulating EASM circulation and rainfall patterns over EC and the YRD. Results from this work demonstrate the capability and limitations in the aerosol, cloud, and precipitation representation of WRF-CAM5 for regional-scale applications down to relatively fine horizontal resolutions. Further WRF-CAM5 model development and application in this area is needed.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1406675
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-129852
Journal ID: ISSN 1352-2310; KP1703010
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Atmospheric Environment (1994); Journal Volume: 169; Journal Issue: C
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Campbell, Patrick, Zhang, Yang, Wang, Kai, Leung, Ruby, Fan, Jiwen, Zheng, Bo, Zhang, Qiang, and He, Kebin. Evaluation of a multi-scale WRF-CAM5 simulation during the 2010 East Asian Summer Monsoon. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2017.09.008.
Campbell, Patrick, Zhang, Yang, Wang, Kai, Leung, Ruby, Fan, Jiwen, Zheng, Bo, Zhang, Qiang, & He, Kebin. Evaluation of a multi-scale WRF-CAM5 simulation during the 2010 East Asian Summer Monsoon. United States. doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2017.09.008.
Campbell, Patrick, Zhang, Yang, Wang, Kai, Leung, Ruby, Fan, Jiwen, Zheng, Bo, Zhang, Qiang, and He, Kebin. 2017. "Evaluation of a multi-scale WRF-CAM5 simulation during the 2010 East Asian Summer Monsoon". United States. doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2017.09.008.
@article{osti_1406675,
title = {Evaluation of a multi-scale WRF-CAM5 simulation during the 2010 East Asian Summer Monsoon},
author = {Campbell, Patrick and Zhang, Yang and Wang, Kai and Leung, Ruby and Fan, Jiwen and Zheng, Bo and Zhang, Qiang and He, Kebin},
abstractNote = {The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) with the physics package of the Community Atmosphere Model Version 5 (CAM5) has been applied at multiple scales over Eastern China (EC) and the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) to evaluate how increased horizontal resolution with physics designed for a coarser resolution climate model impacts aerosols and clouds, and the resulting precipitation characteristics and performance during the 2010 East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM). Despite large underpredictions in surface aerosol concentrations and aerosol optical depth, there is good spatial agreement with surface observations of chemical predictions, and increasing spatial resolution tends to improve performance. Model bias and normalized root mean square values for precipitation predictions are relatively small, but there are significant differences when comparing modeled and observed probability density functions for precipitation in EC and YRD. Increasing model horizontal resolution tends to reduce model bias and error for precipitation predictions. The surface and column aerosol loading is maximized between about 32N and 42N in early to mid-May during the 2010 EASM, and then shifts north while decreasing in magnitude during July and August. Changing model resolution moderately changes the spatiotemporal relationships between aerosols, cloud properties, and precipitation during the EASM, thus demonstrating the importance of model grid resolution in simulating EASM circulation and rainfall patterns over EC and the YRD. Results from this work demonstrate the capability and limitations in the aerosol, cloud, and precipitation representation of WRF-CAM5 for regional-scale applications down to relatively fine horizontal resolutions. Further WRF-CAM5 model development and application in this area is needed.},
doi = {10.1016/j.atmosenv.2017.09.008},
journal = {Atmospheric Environment (1994)},
number = C,
volume = 169,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}
  • The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) with the physics package of the Community Atmosphere Model Version 5 (CAM5) has been applied at multiple scales over Eastern China (EC) and the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) to evaluate how increased horizontal resolution with physics designed for a coarser resolution climate model impacts aerosols and clouds, and the resulting precipitation characteristics and performance during the 2010 East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM). Despite large underpredictions in surface aerosol concentrations and aerosol optical depth, there is good spatial agreement with surface observations of chemical predictions, and increasing spatial resolution tends to improvemore » performance. Model bias and normalized root mean square values for precipitation predictions are relatively small, but there are significant differences when comparing modeled and observed probability density functions for precipitation in EC and YRD. Increasing model horizontal resolution tends to reduce model bias and error for precipitation predictions. The surface and column aerosol loading is maximized between about 32°N and 42°N in early to mid-May during the 2010 EASM, and then shifts north while decreasing in magnitude during July and August. Changing model resolution moderately changes the spatiotemporal relationships between aerosols, cloud properties, and precipitation during the EASM, thus demonstrating the importance of model grid resolution in simulating EASM circulation and rainfall patterns over EC and the YRD. In conclusion, results from this work demonstrate the capability and limitations in the aerosol, cloud, and precipitation representation of WRF-CAM5 for regional-scale applications down to relatively fine horizontal resolutions. Further WRF-CAM5 model development and application in this area is needed.« less
  • Reasonably modeling the magnitude, south-north gradient and seasonal propagation of precipitation associated with the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) is a challenging task in the climate community. In this study we calibrate five key parameters in the Kain-Fritsch convection scheme in the WRF model using an efficient importance-sampling algorithm to improve the EASM simulation. We also examine the impacts of the improved EASM precipitation on other physical process. Our results suggest similar model sensitivity and values of optimized parameters across years with different EASM intensities. By applying the optimal parameters, the simulated precipitation and surface energy features are generally improved.more » The parameters related to downdraft, entrainment coefficients and CAPE consumption time (CCT) can most sensitively affect the precipitation and atmospheric features. Larger downdraft coefficient or CCT decrease the heavy rainfall frequency, while larger entrainment coefficient delays the convection development but build up more potential for heavy rainfall events, causing a possible northward shift of rainfall distribution. The CCT is the most sensitive parameter over wet region and the downdraft parameter plays more important roles over drier northern region. Long-term simulations confirm that by using the optimized parameters the precipitation distributions are better simulated in both weak and strong EASM years. Due to more reasonable simulated precipitation condensational heating, the monsoon circulations are also improved. Lastly, by using the optimized parameters the biases in the retreating (beginning) of Mei-yu (northern China rainfall) simulated by the standard WRF model are evidently reduced and the seasonal and sub-seasonal variations of the monsoon precipitation are remarkably improved.« less
  • This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of interannual and interdecadal variations of summer precipitation and precipitation-related extreme events in China associated with variations of the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) from 1979-2012. A high-quality daily precipitation dataset covering 2287 weather stations in China is analyzed. Based on the precipitation pattern analysis using empirical orthogonal functions, three sub-periods of 1979-1992 (period I), 1993-1999 (period II) and 2000-2012 (period III) are identified to be representative of the precipitation variability. Similar significant variability of the extreme precipitation indices is found across four sub-regions in eastern China. The spatial patterns of summer mean precipitation,more » the number of days with daily rainfall exceeding 95th percentile precipitation (R95p) and the maximum number of consecutive wet days (CWD) anomalies are consistent, but opposite to that of maximum consecutive dry days (CDD) anomalies during the three sub-periods. However, the spatial patterns of hydroclimatic intensity (HY-INT) are notably different from that of the other three extreme indices, but highly correlated to the dry events. The changes of precipitation anomaly patterns are accompanied by the change of the EASM regime and the abrupt shift of the position of the west Pacific subtropical high around 1992/1993 and 1999/2000, respectively, which influence the moisture transport that contributes most to the precipitation anomalies. Lastly, the EASM intensity is linked to sea surface temperature anomaly over the tropical Indian and Pacific Ocean that influences deep convection over the oceans.« less
  • A regional climate model based on the Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) was used to simulate the 1998 and 1999 East Asian summer monsoon conditions. Simulations were performed for 1 April – 31 August of each year, with initial and lateral boundary conditions provided by the ECMWF analysis. Observations from the 1998 and 1999 GAME/HUBEX experiments were used to evaluate the regional climate simulations. Based on observations, large differences can be found between the 1998 and 1999 meteorological conditions and surface energy budgets at the Shouxian station during the IOPs, with much higher rain intensity but only slightly higher rainmore » frequency in 1998 than 1999. For 1998, although the regional climate model was able to reproduce the general spatial distribution of monthly mean rainfall quite well during the summer monsoon season, large discrepancies can be found in comparing the observed and simulated surface climate and energy fluxes in the HUBEX region. By using Four Dimensional Data Assimilation (FDDA) technique, which constrains the simulated large-scale circulation with observations from 21 soundings in the HUBEX α-scale region, both the root mean square error and mean bias in rainfall were greatly reduced. The improvements in simulating rainfall were related to both reduction in errors of precipitation amount and timing. In the control simulation, a mean bias of -63 W/m² (-36%) was found in the simulated surface net radiation at Shouxian, which suggest large errors in simulating clouds in the region. With FDDA, the bias was significantly reduced to -23 W/m² (-13%), with corresponding reduction of bias in the latent heat flux. This suggests that at least part of the model bias in simulating net radiation is related to errors in simulating the large-scale circulation, which can affect cloud amount and vertical distribution. Comparing the 1998 and 1999 simulations, both without FDDA, smaller biases were found in the surface fluxes during 1999. Percentage biases in the net radiation and latent heat flux were -18% and -33% in 1999 and -36% and -50% in 1998 respectively. Based on observations, large differences in the net surface radiation, and small differences in cloud fraction between the two years suggest that cloud optical depth and/or vertical distribution were very different, with more cloudy conditions observed during 1999. Although the 1999 simulations were sensitive to the cumulus convective parameterizations (Grell scheme versus Kain-Fritsch scheme) as shown by the sensitivity experiments, the large differences in simulation skill between the 1998 and 1999 cases, regardless of the convection schemes used, suggest possible dependence of model errors on cloud properties that deserve further investigations.« less