skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Proceedings for Lunch and Learn: Making science fun and exciting through social media

Abstract

Social media channels are vital for outreach and offer huge opportunities for scientists to directly engage with the public using nontraditional methods – including lots of creativity and humor. The physics community’s presence is growing more significant, and this session (designed for early career researchers) provided a lively discussion with experts in the domain. We covered how to best use social media to raise public awareness of science, share excitement and progress, and cultivate support from followers. We also discussed some of the thornier issues in social media, such as capturing the complexity of both the scientific process and the science itself.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]; ;  [2]
  1. Fermilab
  2. CERN
  3. Paris, IN2P3
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1402480
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-CONF-16-710-DI
1597671
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: PoS; Journal Volume: ICHEP2016; Conference: 38th International Conference on High Energy Physics, Chicago, IL, USA, 08/03-08/10/2016
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Biron, Lauren, Haffner, Julie, Nellist, Clara, Cowern, Dianna, and Marsollier, Arnaud. Proceedings for Lunch and Learn: Making science fun and exciting through social media. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Biron, Lauren, Haffner, Julie, Nellist, Clara, Cowern, Dianna, & Marsollier, Arnaud. Proceedings for Lunch and Learn: Making science fun and exciting through social media. United States.
Biron, Lauren, Haffner, Julie, Nellist, Clara, Cowern, Dianna, and Marsollier, Arnaud. Tue . "Proceedings for Lunch and Learn: Making science fun and exciting through social media". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1402480.
@article{osti_1402480,
title = {Proceedings for Lunch and Learn: Making science fun and exciting through social media},
author = {Biron, Lauren and Haffner, Julie and Nellist, Clara and Cowern, Dianna and Marsollier, Arnaud},
abstractNote = {Social media channels are vital for outreach and offer huge opportunities for scientists to directly engage with the public using nontraditional methods – including lots of creativity and humor. The physics community’s presence is growing more significant, and this session (designed for early career researchers) provided a lively discussion with experts in the domain. We covered how to best use social media to raise public awareness of science, share excitement and progress, and cultivate support from followers. We also discussed some of the thornier issues in social media, such as capturing the complexity of both the scientific process and the science itself.},
doi = {},
journal = {PoS},
number = ,
volume = ICHEP2016,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Feb 07 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Feb 07 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • America is facing a quiet crisis in the scientific and technology fields. Elementary school teachers are required to teach outside their specialty area using outdated materials. Furthering this crisis, teachers don`t have time to search for their own materials. These teachers need affordable instructional materials that are fun and easy to teach. Recognizing the importance of teaching science and technology in the classroom, the Arizona Department of Commerce Energy Office developed a Solar Energy Education Packet for Teachers. Also, an implementation workshop was developed to instruct teachers on how to use the materials in the packet. In this paper, themore » author demonstrates the overwhelming acceptability of using solar cooking for teaching solar science principles and technology in the classroom. By taking a fun and inexpensive approach to teaching the solar science principles, they have created a program that has been embraced not only by teachers, but by students as well.« less
  • Social networks can be thought of as noisy sensor networks mapping real world information to the web. Owing to the extensive body of literature in sensor network analysis, this work sought to apply several novel and traditional methods in sensor network analysis for the purposes of efficiently interrogating social media data streams from raw data. We carefully revisit our definition of a social media signal from previous work both in terms of time-varying features within the data and the networked nature of the medium. Further, we detail our analysis of global patterns in Twitter over the months of November 2013more » and June 2014, detect and categorize events, and illustrate how these analyses can be used to inform graph-based models of Twitter, namely using a recent network influence model called PhySense: similar to PageRank but tuned to behavioral analysis by leveraging a sociologically inspired probabilistic model. We ultimately identify forms of information dissemination via analysis of time series and dynamic graph spectra and corroborate these findings through manual investigation of the data as a requisite step in modeling the diffusion process with PhySense. We hope to sufficiently characterize global behavior in a medium such as Twitter as a means of learning global model parameters one may use to predict or simulate behavior on a large scale. We have made our time series and dynamic graph analytical code available via a GitHub repository https://github.com/cpatdowling/salsa and our data are available upon request.« less
  • Within the energy research community, social sciences tends to be viewed fairly narrowly, often as simply a marketing tool to change the behavior of consumers and decision makers, and to ''attack market barriers''. As we see it, social sciences, which draws on sociology, psychology, political science, business administration, and other academic disciplines, is capable of far more. A social science perspective can re-align questions in ways that can lead to the development of technologies and technology policy that are much stronger and potentially more successful than they would be otherwise. In most energy policies governing commercial buildings, the prevailing Rmore » and D directives are firmly rooted in a technology framework, one that is generally more quantitative and evaluative than that fostered by the social sciences. To illustrate how social science thinking would approach the goal of achieving high energy performance in the commercial building sector, they focus on the US Department of Energy's Roadmap for commercial buildings (DOE 2000) as a starting point. By ''deconstructing'' the four strategies provided by the Roadmap, they set the stage for proposing a closer partnership between advocates of technology-based and social science-based approaches.« less