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Title: Brazed Carbon Nanotube Arrays: Decoupling Thermal Conductance and Mechanical Rigidity

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [1]
  1. School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN 47907 USA, Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN 47907 USA
  2. Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN 47907 USA
  3. School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN 47907 USA, Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN 47907 USA, State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 China
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1400814
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Advanced Materials Interfaces
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 5; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 15:30:47; Journal ID: ISSN 2196-7350
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
Germany
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Hao, Menglong, Kumar, Anurag, Hodson, Stephen L., Zemlyanov, Dmitry, He, Pingge, and Fisher, Timothy S.. Brazed Carbon Nanotube Arrays: Decoupling Thermal Conductance and Mechanical Rigidity. Germany: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/admi.201601042.
Hao, Menglong, Kumar, Anurag, Hodson, Stephen L., Zemlyanov, Dmitry, He, Pingge, & Fisher, Timothy S.. Brazed Carbon Nanotube Arrays: Decoupling Thermal Conductance and Mechanical Rigidity. Germany. doi:10.1002/admi.201601042.
Hao, Menglong, Kumar, Anurag, Hodson, Stephen L., Zemlyanov, Dmitry, He, Pingge, and Fisher, Timothy S.. Fri . "Brazed Carbon Nanotube Arrays: Decoupling Thermal Conductance and Mechanical Rigidity". Germany. doi:10.1002/admi.201601042.
@article{osti_1400814,
title = {Brazed Carbon Nanotube Arrays: Decoupling Thermal Conductance and Mechanical Rigidity},
author = {Hao, Menglong and Kumar, Anurag and Hodson, Stephen L. and Zemlyanov, Dmitry and He, Pingge and Fisher, Timothy S.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/admi.201601042},
journal = {Advanced Materials Interfaces},
number = 5,
volume = 4,
place = {Germany},
year = {Fri Jan 27 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Fri Jan 27 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1002/admi.201601042

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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