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Title: Gas source attribution techniques for assessing leakage at geologic CO 2 storage sites: Evaluating a CO 2 and CH 4 soil gas anomaly at the Cranfield CO 2 -EOR site

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1397645
Grant/Contract Number:
FC26-05NT42590
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Chemical Geology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 454; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-04 21:37:50; Journal ID: ISSN 0009-2541
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Anderson, Jacob S., Romanak, Katherine D., Yang, Changbing, Lu, Jiemin, Hovorka, Susan D., and Young, Michael H.. Gas source attribution techniques for assessing leakage at geologic CO 2 storage sites: Evaluating a CO 2 and CH 4 soil gas anomaly at the Cranfield CO 2 -EOR site. Netherlands: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.chemgeo.2017.02.024.
Anderson, Jacob S., Romanak, Katherine D., Yang, Changbing, Lu, Jiemin, Hovorka, Susan D., & Young, Michael H.. Gas source attribution techniques for assessing leakage at geologic CO 2 storage sites: Evaluating a CO 2 and CH 4 soil gas anomaly at the Cranfield CO 2 -EOR site. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.chemgeo.2017.02.024.
Anderson, Jacob S., Romanak, Katherine D., Yang, Changbing, Lu, Jiemin, Hovorka, Susan D., and Young, Michael H.. Sat . "Gas source attribution techniques for assessing leakage at geologic CO 2 storage sites: Evaluating a CO 2 and CH 4 soil gas anomaly at the Cranfield CO 2 -EOR site". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.chemgeo.2017.02.024.
@article{osti_1397645,
title = {Gas source attribution techniques for assessing leakage at geologic CO 2 storage sites: Evaluating a CO 2 and CH 4 soil gas anomaly at the Cranfield CO 2 -EOR site},
author = {Anderson, Jacob S. and Romanak, Katherine D. and Yang, Changbing and Lu, Jiemin and Hovorka, Susan D. and Young, Michael H.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.chemgeo.2017.02.024},
journal = {Chemical Geology},
number = C,
volume = 454,
place = {Netherlands},
year = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.chemgeo.2017.02.024

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • Near-surface monitoring and subsurface characterization activities were undertaken in collaboration with the Southwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership on their San Juan Basin coal-bed methane pilot test site near Navajo City, New Mexico. Nearly 18,407 short tons (1.670 × 107 kg) of CO{sub 2} were injected into 3 seams of the Fruitland coal between July 2008 and April 2009. Between September 18 and October 30, 2008, two additions of approximately 20 L each of perfluorocarbon (PFC) tracers were mixed with the CO{sub 2} at the injection wellhead. PFC tracers in soil-gas and in the atmosphere were monitored over a period ofmore » 2 years using a rectangular array of permanent installations. Additional monitors were placed near existing well bores and at other locations of potential leakage identified during the pre-injection site survey. Monitoring was conducted using sorbent containing tubes to collect any released PFC tracer from soil-gas or the atmosphere. Near-surface monitoring activities also included CO{sub 2} surface flux and carbon isotopes, soil-gas hydrocarbon levels, and electrical conductivity in the soil. The value of the PFC tracers was demonstrated when a significant leakage event was detected near an offset production well. Subsurface characterization activities, including 3D seismic interpretation and attribute analysis, were conducted to evaluate reservoir integrity and the potential that leakage of injected CO{sub 2} might occur. Leakage from the injection reservoir was not detected. PFC tracers made breakthroughs at 2 of 3 offset wells which were not otherwise directly observable in produced gases containing 20–30% CO{sub 2}. These results have aided reservoir geophysical and simulation investigations to track the underground movement of CO{sub 2}. 3D seismic analysis provided a possible interpretation for the order of appearance of tracers at production wells.« less
  • The entrapment of environmentally important materials to enable containment of polluting wastes from industry or energy production, storage of alternative fuels, or water sanitation, is of vital and immediate importance. Many of these materials are small molecules or ions that can be encapsulated via their adsorption into framework structures to create a host-guest complex. This is an ever-growing field of study and, as such, the search for more suitable porous materials for environmental applications is fundamental to progress. However, many industrial areas that require the use of adsorbents are fraught with practical challenges such as high temperatures, rapid gas expansion,more » radioactivity, or repetitive gas cycling, that the host material must withstand. Inorganic phosphates have a proven history of rigid structures, thermal stability, and are suspected to possess good resistance to radiation over geologic time scales. Furthermore, various experimental studies have established their ability to adsorb small molecules, such as water. In light of this, all known crystal structures of phosphate frameworks with meta- (P 3O 9) or ultra- (P 5O 14) stoichiometries are combined in a data-mining survey together with all theoretically possible structures of Ln aP bO c (where a, b, c are any integer, and Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, or Tm) that are statistically likely to form. Topological patterns within these framework structures are used to assess their suitability for hosting a variety of small guest molecules or ions that are important for environmental applications: CO 2, H 2O, UO 2, PuO 2, U, Pu, Sr 2+, Cs +, CH 4 and H 2. A range of viable phosphate-based host-guest complexes are identified from this data-mining and pattern-based structural analysis. Moreover, distinct topological preferences for hosting such guests are found, and metaphosphate stoichiometries are generally preferred over ultraphosphate configurations.« less
  • Cited by 6
  • The identification of inorganic materials, which are able to encapsulate environmentally important small molecules or ions via host-guest interactions, is crucial for the design and development of next-generation energy sources and for storing environmental waste. Especially sought after are molecular sponges with the ability to incorporate CO 2, gas pollutants, or nuclear waste materials such as UO 2 and PuO 2 oxides or U, Pu, Sr 2+ or Cs + ions. Porous framework structures promise very attractive prospects for applications in environmental technologies, if they are able to incorporate CH 4 for biogas energy applications, or to store H 2,more » which is important for fuel cells e.g. in the automotive industry. All of these applications should benefit from the host being resistant to extreme conditions such as heat, nuclear radiation, rapid gas expansion, or wear and tear from heavy gas cycling. As inorganic tungstates are well known for their thermal stability, and their rigid open-framework networks, the potential of Na 2O-Al 2O 3-WO 3 and Na 2O-WO 3 phases for such applications was evaluated. To this end, all known experimentally-determined crystal structures with the stoichiometric formula M aM’ bW cO d (M = any element) are surveyed together with all corresponding theoretically calculated Na aAl bW cO d and Na xW yO z structures that are statistically likely to form. Network descriptors that categorize these host structures are used to reveal topological patterns in the hosts, including the nature of porous cages which are able to accommodate a certain type of guest; this leads to the classification of preferential structure types for a given environmental storage application. Crystal structures of two new tungstates NaAlW 2O 8 (1) and NaAlW 3O 11 (2) and one updated structure determination of Na 2W 2O 7 (3) are also presented from in-house X-ray diffraction studies, and their potential merits for environmental applications are assessed against those of this larger data-sourced survey. Altogether, results show that tungstate structures with three-nodal topologies are most frequently able to accommodate CH 4 or H 2, while CO 2 appears to be captured by a wide range of nodal structure types. The computationally generated host structures appear systematically smaller than the experimentally determined structures. For the structures of 1 and 2, potential applications in nuclear waste storage seem feasible.« less