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Title: Brentwood Lessons Learned Project Report

Abstract

The purpose of this report is to document lessons learned in the installation of the hydrogen fueling station at the National Park Service Brentwood site in Washington, D.C., to help further the deployment of hydrogen infrastructure required to support hydrogen and other fuel cell technologies. Hydrogen fueling is the most difficult infrastructure component to build and permit. Hydrogen fueling can include augmenting hydrogen fueling capability to existing conventional fuel fueling stations as well as building brand new hydrogen fueling stations. This report was produced as part of the Brentwood Lessons Learned project. The project consisted of transplanting an existing modular hydrogen fueling station from Connecticut to the National Park Service Brentwood site. This relocation required design and construction at the Brentwood site to accommodate the existing station design as well as installation and validation of the updated station. One of the most important lessons learned was that simply moving an existing modular station to an operating site was not necessarily straight-forward - performing the relocation required significant effort and cost. The station has to function at the selected operating site and this functionality requires a power supply, building supports connecting to an existing alarm system, electrical grounding and lighting, providingmore » nitrogen for purging, and providing deionized water if an electrolyzer is part of the station package. Most importantly, the station has to fit into the existing site both spatially and operationally and not disrupt existing operations at the site. All of this coordination and integration requires logistical planning and project management. The idea that a hydrogen fueling station can be simply dropped onto a site and made immediately operational is generally not realistic. Other important lessons learned include that delineating the boundaries of the multiple jurisdictions that have authority over a project for all parties involved in the project are key to an efficient approval process; and site investigation is necessary when integrating a new station design onto an existing site, particularly an older existing site that may have limited documentation on the site history and operations. The lessons learned for permitting and subcontracting construction work can be applied to other similar sites and to commercial sites.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
  2. Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Fuel Cell Technologies Office (EE-3F)
OSTI Identifier:
1395933
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-5400-68769
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; hydrogen fueling station; electrolyzer; safety; permitting; fire service

Citation Formats

Rivkin, Carl H., Caton, Melanie C., Ainscough, Christopher D., and Marcinkoski, Jason. Brentwood Lessons Learned Project Report. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1395933.
Rivkin, Carl H., Caton, Melanie C., Ainscough, Christopher D., & Marcinkoski, Jason. Brentwood Lessons Learned Project Report. United States. doi:10.2172/1395933.
Rivkin, Carl H., Caton, Melanie C., Ainscough, Christopher D., and Marcinkoski, Jason. 2017. "Brentwood Lessons Learned Project Report". United States. doi:10.2172/1395933. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1395933.
@article{osti_1395933,
title = {Brentwood Lessons Learned Project Report},
author = {Rivkin, Carl H. and Caton, Melanie C. and Ainscough, Christopher D. and Marcinkoski, Jason},
abstractNote = {The purpose of this report is to document lessons learned in the installation of the hydrogen fueling station at the National Park Service Brentwood site in Washington, D.C., to help further the deployment of hydrogen infrastructure required to support hydrogen and other fuel cell technologies. Hydrogen fueling is the most difficult infrastructure component to build and permit. Hydrogen fueling can include augmenting hydrogen fueling capability to existing conventional fuel fueling stations as well as building brand new hydrogen fueling stations. This report was produced as part of the Brentwood Lessons Learned project. The project consisted of transplanting an existing modular hydrogen fueling station from Connecticut to the National Park Service Brentwood site. This relocation required design and construction at the Brentwood site to accommodate the existing station design as well as installation and validation of the updated station. One of the most important lessons learned was that simply moving an existing modular station to an operating site was not necessarily straight-forward - performing the relocation required significant effort and cost. The station has to function at the selected operating site and this functionality requires a power supply, building supports connecting to an existing alarm system, electrical grounding and lighting, providing nitrogen for purging, and providing deionized water if an electrolyzer is part of the station package. Most importantly, the station has to fit into the existing site both spatially and operationally and not disrupt existing operations at the site. All of this coordination and integration requires logistical planning and project management. The idea that a hydrogen fueling station can be simply dropped onto a site and made immediately operational is generally not realistic. Other important lessons learned include that delineating the boundaries of the multiple jurisdictions that have authority over a project for all parties involved in the project are key to an efficient approval process; and site investigation is necessary when integrating a new station design onto an existing site, particularly an older existing site that may have limited documentation on the site history and operations. The lessons learned for permitting and subcontracting construction work can be applied to other similar sites and to commercial sites.},
doi = {10.2172/1395933},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 9
}

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