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Title: How Water’s Properties Are Encoded in Its Molecular Structure and Energies

Authors:
;  [1]; ;  [2];  [2]; ORCiD logo
  1. Department of Chemistry, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078, United States
  2. Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Večna pot 113, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1394872
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02-09ER16052
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Chemical Reviews
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 117; Journal Issue: 19; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-11 04:09:26; Journal ID: ISSN 0009-2665
Publisher:
American Chemical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Brini, Emiliano, Fennell, Christopher J., Fernandez-Serra, Marivi, Hribar-Lee, Barbara, Lukšič, Miha, and Dill, Ken A. How Water’s Properties Are Encoded in Its Molecular Structure and Energies. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.chemrev.7b00259.
Brini, Emiliano, Fennell, Christopher J., Fernandez-Serra, Marivi, Hribar-Lee, Barbara, Lukšič, Miha, & Dill, Ken A. How Water’s Properties Are Encoded in Its Molecular Structure and Energies. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.chemrev.7b00259.
Brini, Emiliano, Fennell, Christopher J., Fernandez-Serra, Marivi, Hribar-Lee, Barbara, Lukšič, Miha, and Dill, Ken A. 2017. "How Water’s Properties Are Encoded in Its Molecular Structure and Energies". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.chemrev.7b00259.
@article{osti_1394872,
title = {How Water’s Properties Are Encoded in Its Molecular Structure and Energies},
author = {Brini, Emiliano and Fennell, Christopher J. and Fernandez-Serra, Marivi and Hribar-Lee, Barbara and Lukšič, Miha and Dill, Ken A.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1021/acs.chemrev.7b00259},
journal = {Chemical Reviews},
number = 19,
volume = 117,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 9
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1021/acs.chemrev.7b00259

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