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Title: Evaluation of the US Department of Energy Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program (2010-2014)

Abstract

This report contains results from analysis conducted on each of the Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program (WIPP) grants awarded to 16 organizations by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in 2010. The purpose of WIPP was to explore the potential adoptability or replicability of innovative processes or technologies for the enhancement of DOE’s Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). DOE initiated the WIPP grant to accelerate effective innovations in home energy efficiency and other WAP mission-related goals for income-qualifying households of low socioeconomic status. This study was performed alongside a broader, national evaluation of WAP conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for DOE.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1394313
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2017/245
74708
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Tonn, Bruce Edward, Rose, Erin M., and Hawkins, Beth A.. Evaluation of the US Department of Energy Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program (2010-2014). United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1394313.
Tonn, Bruce Edward, Rose, Erin M., & Hawkins, Beth A.. Evaluation of the US Department of Energy Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program (2010-2014). United States. doi:10.2172/1394313.
Tonn, Bruce Edward, Rose, Erin M., and Hawkins, Beth A.. Mon . "Evaluation of the US Department of Energy Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program (2010-2014)". United States. doi:10.2172/1394313. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1394313.
@article{osti_1394313,
title = {Evaluation of the US Department of Energy Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program (2010-2014)},
author = {Tonn, Bruce Edward and Rose, Erin M. and Hawkins, Beth A.},
abstractNote = {This report contains results from analysis conducted on each of the Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program (WIPP) grants awarded to 16 organizations by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in 2010. The purpose of WIPP was to explore the potential adoptability or replicability of innovative processes or technologies for the enhancement of DOE’s Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). DOE initiated the WIPP grant to accelerate effective innovations in home energy efficiency and other WAP mission-related goals for income-qualifying households of low socioeconomic status. This study was performed alongside a broader, national evaluation of WAP conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for DOE.},
doi = {10.2172/1394313},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The Oklahoma Department of Commerce (ODOC) received a Department of Energy grant to assist Weatherization Assistance Program Subgrantees (Community Action Agencies) develop for profit energy-related business ventures. ODOC has successfully administered all Federal grant funds in accordance with the terms and conditions specified in the grant agreement.
  • This report presents three diagnostic tools intended as management aids in DOE's oversite of the Low Income Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). A need for such tools was demonstrated during the course of a 20 state monitoring effort conducted for WAP in 1982 by the Arawak Consulting Corporation. At the conclusion of the project, the monitors proposed that some methodologies for comparing the performance of local agencies should be developed. All three of these tools which were developed utilize the same data elements for the basis for analysis: Number of units weatherized; amount of funds expended on installed weatherization materials; andmore » subgrantee labor costs. These three data elements can be aggregated and analyzed from several different viewpoints and levels of complexity; the diagnostic tools themselves are presented in an ascending order of complexity. For the purpose of explication, the assumption is made that a weatherization program evaluation is being performed. This implies that all data collected and analyzed is based upon a subgrantees' total weatherization effort, whatever the funding source. The discussion of each tool includes a presentation of its explanatory scope, its data requirements, the tool's predictive limitations, and the probable management uses for each.« less
  • Case Study with WIPP program overview, information regarding eligibility, and successes from Pennsylvania's Commission on Economic Opportunity (CEO) that demonstrate innovative approaches that maximize the benefit of the program. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) recently launched the Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program (WIPP) to accelerate innovations in whole-house weatherization and advance DOE's goal of increasing the energy efficiency and health and safety of homes of low-income families. Since 2010, WIPP has helped weatherization service providers as well as new and nontraditional partners leverage non-federal financial resources to supplement federal grants, saving taxpayer money.more » WIPP complements the Weatherization Assistance program (WAP), which operates nation-wide, in U.S. territories and in three Native American tribes. 16 grantees are implementing weatherization innovation projects using experimental approaches to find new and better ways to weatherize homes. They are using approaches such as: (1) Financial tools - by understanding a diverse range of financing mechanisms, grantees can maximize the impact of the federal grant dollars while providing high-quality work and benefits to eligible low-income clients; (2) Green and healthy homes - in addition to helping families reduce their energy costs, grantees can protect their health and safety. Two WIPP projects (Connecticut and Maryland) will augment standard weatherization services with a comprehensive green and healthy homes approach; (3) New technologies and techniques - following the model of continuous improvement in weatherization, WIPP grantees will continue to use new and better technologies and techniques to improve the quality of work; (4) Residential energy behavior change - Two grantees are rigorously testing home energy monitors (HEMs) that display energy used in kilowatt-hours, allowing residents to monitor and reduce their energy use, and another is examining best-practices for mobile home energy efficiency; (5) Workforce development and volunteers - with a goal of creating a self-sustaining weatherization model that does not require future federal investment, three grantees are adapting business models successful in other sectors of the home performance business to perform weatherization work. Youthbuild is training youth to perform home energy upgrades to eligible clients and Habitat for Humanity is developing a model for how to incorporate volunteer labor in home weatherization. These innovative approaches will improve key weatherization outcomes, such as: Increasing the total number of homes that are weatherized; Reducing the weatherization cost per home; Increasing the energy savings in each weatherized home; Increasing the number of weatherization jobs created and retained; and Reducing greenhouse gas emissions.« less
  • The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs Office (WIPO) launched the Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program (WIPP) to accelerate innovations in whole-house weatherization and advance DOE's goal of increasing the energy efficiency and health and safety of low-income residences without the utilization of additional taxpayer funding. Sixteen WIPP grantees were awarded a total of $30 million in Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) funds in September 2010. These projects focused on: including nontraditional partners in weatherization service delivery; leveraging significant non-federal funding; and improving the effectiveness of low-income weatherization through the use of newmore » materials, technologies, behavior-change models, and processes.« less
  • This report presents a summary of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy s low-income Weatherization Program. This evaluation focused on the WAP Program Year 2010. The ARRA evaluation produced fourteen separate reports, including this summary. Three separate reports address the energy savings, energy cost savings, and cost effectiveness of WAP across four housing types: single family, mobile home, and large multifamily. Other reports address the environmental emissions benefits attributable to WAP, and characterize the program. Special studies were conducted to: estimate the impacts of weatherization and healthy homes interventions onmore » asthma-related Medicaid claims in a small cohort in Washington State; assess how weatherization recipients communicate their weatherization experiences to those in their social network, and assess processes implemented to defer homes for weatherization. Small studies addressed energy use in refrigerators, WAP as implemented in the U.S. territories for the first time, and weatherization s impacts on air conditioning energy savings. The national occupant survey was mined for additional insights on the impacts of weatherization on household budgets and energy behaviors post-weatherization. Lastly, the results of a survey of weatherization training centers are summarized.« less