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Title: Comparison of Hybrid K-Edge Densitometer (HKED) Performance Operating with the Canberra Lynx MCA and the Canberra ICB-NIM Electronics

Abstract

From the 1991 until 2008 the Canberra Hybrid K-Edge Densitometer systems were provided with ICB-NIM (Integrated Control Bus – Nuclear Instrument Module) acquisition electronics. Newer electronics modules, such as the Lynx, were not supported under the VMS based operating system. The LYNX module was provided as the standard acquisition electronics following the release of the Windows based CHKED software. This report compares the electronics dead-time, gain shifts, detector resolution and measurement performance of the HKED system operated with the two types of acquisition modules. The comparison was performed using measurements obtained with the ORNL HKED system. The original intent of this study was to take advantage of both the timing and energy outputs from the HPGE detector to acquire data with both sets of electronics in parallel. Although this approach has been applied successfully with other systems, in this case we found the timing output produced a significant amount of noise such that a comparison between the electronics would be invalid. So the comparative measurements were performed sequentially. The ICB-NIM data was acquired over the course of 12 months with 255 measurements while the LYNX data was acquired over a period of 10 months with 75 measurements. To simplify themore » comparison, all data used in this study was acquired using the Canberra CHKED (V1.0) software package. The performance analysis was based primarily on the peak locations, peak widths and concentration values reported by the CHKED software. The raw spectra from the XRF measurements were also examined to extract additional 109Cd peak location and width data for the hybrid measurements (the standard hybrid report template does not report these values).« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1394248
Report Number(s):
ORNL/LTR-2016/630
71014
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Citation Formats

McElroy, Robert Dennis. Comparison of Hybrid K-Edge Densitometer (HKED) Performance Operating with the Canberra Lynx MCA and the Canberra ICB-NIM Electronics. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1394248.
McElroy, Robert Dennis. Comparison of Hybrid K-Edge Densitometer (HKED) Performance Operating with the Canberra Lynx MCA and the Canberra ICB-NIM Electronics. United States. doi:10.2172/1394248.
McElroy, Robert Dennis. Sat . "Comparison of Hybrid K-Edge Densitometer (HKED) Performance Operating with the Canberra Lynx MCA and the Canberra ICB-NIM Electronics". United States. doi:10.2172/1394248. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1394248.
@article{osti_1394248,
title = {Comparison of Hybrid K-Edge Densitometer (HKED) Performance Operating with the Canberra Lynx MCA and the Canberra ICB-NIM Electronics},
author = {McElroy, Robert Dennis},
abstractNote = {From the 1991 until 2008 the Canberra Hybrid K-Edge Densitometer systems were provided with ICB-NIM (Integrated Control Bus – Nuclear Instrument Module) acquisition electronics. Newer electronics modules, such as the Lynx, were not supported under the VMS based operating system. The LYNX module was provided as the standard acquisition electronics following the release of the Windows based CHKED software. This report compares the electronics dead-time, gain shifts, detector resolution and measurement performance of the HKED system operated with the two types of acquisition modules. The comparison was performed using measurements obtained with the ORNL HKED system. The original intent of this study was to take advantage of both the timing and energy outputs from the HPGE detector to acquire data with both sets of electronics in parallel. Although this approach has been applied successfully with other systems, in this case we found the timing output produced a significant amount of noise such that a comparison between the electronics would be invalid. So the comparative measurements were performed sequentially. The ICB-NIM data was acquired over the course of 12 months with 255 measurements while the LYNX data was acquired over a period of 10 months with 75 measurements. To simplify the comparison, all data used in this study was acquired using the Canberra CHKED (V1.0) software package. The performance analysis was based primarily on the peak locations, peak widths and concentration values reported by the CHKED software. The raw spectra from the XRF measurements were also examined to extract additional 109Cd peak location and width data for the hybrid measurements (the standard hybrid report template does not report these values).},
doi = {10.2172/1394248},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Sat Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Technical Report:

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  • In 1979, a K-edge densitometer (KED) was installed by the Safeguards Assay group from Los Alamos National Laboratory in the PNC reprocessing plant at Tokai-mura, Japan. It uses an active nondestructive assay technique, KED, to measure the plutonium concentration of the product solution. The measurement uncertainty of an assay depends on the count time chosen, but can be 0.5% or better. The computer hardware and software were upgraded in 1992. This manual describes the operation of the instrument, with an emphasis on the user interface to the software.
  • An in-line, plutonium-solution, K-edge absorption densitometer has been developed at Los Alamos and is currently undergoing test and evaluation at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). The first phase of the test and evaluation (off-line instrument calibration and solution assays) was completed, and preparations are under way to install the instrument in-line, as soon as process schedules permit. Calibration data in the design concentration range of 25 to 40 g Pu/L demonstrate routine achievement of densitometry assay precisions of 0.5% or better in 40 min. Plutonium assays at concentrations outside the calibration range were investigated in an effort to define bettermore » the limitations of the instrument and address other possible assay situations at SRP. Densitometry precisions obtained for 40-min assays range from 3% to 5 g Pu/L down to 0.4% at 70 g Pu/L. At higher plutonium concentrations, the precision deteriorated due to increasing gamma-ray absorption by the solution. In addition, with actinide concentrations above approximately 100 g/L, the assay accuracy also suffered because of enhanced small-angle scattering effects in the large sample cell. Measurements on mixed U/Pu solutions demonstrated the feasibility of accurate plutonium assays with correction for the large uranium matrix contributions being determined from the measurement data. The /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu weight fractions and /sup 241/Pu//sup 239/Pu and /sup 238/Pu//sup 239/Pu isotopic ratios can be determined. In a mockup of the in-line solution plumbing system, all assay sequences, error conditions, and interlock criteria were exercised and verified to be working properly.« less
  • In 1979, a K-edge densitometer (KED) was installed by the Safeguards Assay group from Los Alamos National Laboratory in the PNC reprocessing plant at Tokai-mura, Japan. It uses an active nondestructive assay technique, KED, to measure the plutonium concentration of the product solution. The measurement uncertainty of an assay depends on the count time chosen, but can be 0.5% or better. The computer hardware and software were upgraded in 1992. This manual describes the operation of the instrument, with an emphasis on the user interface to the software.