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Title: Climatic warming in China during 1901–2015 based on an extended dataset of instrumental temperature records

Abstract

Monthly mean instrumental surface air temperature (SAT) observations back to the nineteenth century in China are synthesized from different sources via specific quality-control, interpolation, and homogenization. Compared with the first homogenized long-term SAT dataset for China which contained 18 stations mainly located in the middle and eastern part of China, the present dataset includes homogenized monthly SAT series at 32 stations, with an extended coverage especially towards western China. Missing values are interpolated by using observations at nearby stations, including those from neighboring countries. Cross validation shows that the mean bias error (MBE) is generally small and falls between 0.45 °C and –0.35 °C. Multiple homogenization methods and available metadata are applied to assess the consistency of the time series and to adjust inhomogeneity biases. The homogenized annual mean SAT series shows a range of trends between 1.1 °C and 4.0 °C/century in northeastern China, between 0.4 °C and 1.9 °C/century in southeastern China, and between 1.4 °C and 3.7 °C/century in western China to the west of 105 E (from the initial years of the stations to 2015). The unadjusted data include unusually warm records during the 1940s and hence tend to underestimate the warming trends at a numbermore » of stations. As a result, the mean SAT series for China based on the climate anomaly method shows a warming trend of 1.56 °C/century during 1901–2015, larger than those based on other currently available datasets.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [4]
  1. China Meteorological Administration, Beijing (People's Republic of China)
  2. Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (People's Republic of China)
  3. Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing (People's Republic of China)
  4. Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom); King Abdulaziz, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
China Meteorological Administration, Beijing (People's Republic of China)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1393496
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0005689
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Environmental Research Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 12; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 1748-9326
Publisher:
IOP Publishing
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; surface air temperature (SAT); long-term meteorological observations; homogenization; China; global warming

Citation Formats

Cao, Lijuan, Yan, Zhongwei, Zhao, Ping, Zhu, Yani, Yu, Yu, Tang, Guoli, and Jones, Phil. Climatic warming in China during 1901–2015 based on an extended dataset of instrumental temperature records. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1088/1748-9326/aa68e8.
Cao, Lijuan, Yan, Zhongwei, Zhao, Ping, Zhu, Yani, Yu, Yu, Tang, Guoli, & Jones, Phil. Climatic warming in China during 1901–2015 based on an extended dataset of instrumental temperature records. United States. doi:10.1088/1748-9326/aa68e8.
Cao, Lijuan, Yan, Zhongwei, Zhao, Ping, Zhu, Yani, Yu, Yu, Tang, Guoli, and Jones, Phil. 2017. "Climatic warming in China during 1901–2015 based on an extended dataset of instrumental temperature records". United States. doi:10.1088/1748-9326/aa68e8. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1393496.
@article{osti_1393496,
title = {Climatic warming in China during 1901–2015 based on an extended dataset of instrumental temperature records},
author = {Cao, Lijuan and Yan, Zhongwei and Zhao, Ping and Zhu, Yani and Yu, Yu and Tang, Guoli and Jones, Phil},
abstractNote = {Monthly mean instrumental surface air temperature (SAT) observations back to the nineteenth century in China are synthesized from different sources via specific quality-control, interpolation, and homogenization. Compared with the first homogenized long-term SAT dataset for China which contained 18 stations mainly located in the middle and eastern part of China, the present dataset includes homogenized monthly SAT series at 32 stations, with an extended coverage especially towards western China. Missing values are interpolated by using observations at nearby stations, including those from neighboring countries. Cross validation shows that the mean bias error (MBE) is generally small and falls between 0.45 °C and –0.35 °C. Multiple homogenization methods and available metadata are applied to assess the consistency of the time series and to adjust inhomogeneity biases. The homogenized annual mean SAT series shows a range of trends between 1.1 °C and 4.0 °C/century in northeastern China, between 0.4 °C and 1.9 °C/century in southeastern China, and between 1.4 °C and 3.7 °C/century in western China to the west of 105 E (from the initial years of the stations to 2015). The unadjusted data include unusually warm records during the 1940s and hence tend to underestimate the warming trends at a number of stations. As a result, the mean SAT series for China based on the climate anomaly method shows a warming trend of 1.56 °C/century during 1901–2015, larger than those based on other currently available datasets.},
doi = {10.1088/1748-9326/aa68e8},
journal = {Environmental Research Letters},
number = 6,
volume = 12,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}

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