skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Biochemical transformation of lignin for deriving valued commodities from lignocellulose

Abstract

The biochemical properties of lignin present major obstacles to deriving societally beneficial entities from lignocellulosic biomass, an abundant and renewable feedstock. Similar to other biopolymers such as polysaccharides, polypeptides, and ribonucleic acids, lignin polymers are derived from multiple types of monomeric units. However, lignin’s renowned recalcitrance is largely attributable to its racemic nature and the variety of covalent inter-unit linkages through which its aromatic monomers are linked. Indeed, unlike other biopolymers whose monomers are consistently inter-linked by a single type of covalent bond, the monomeric units in lignin are linked via non-enzymatic, combinatorial radical coupling reactions that give rise to a variety of inter-unit covalent bonds in mildly branched racemic polymers. Yet, despite the chemical complexity and stability of lignin, significant strides have been made in recent years to identify routes through which valued commodities can be derived from it. This paper discusses emerging biological and biochemical means through which degradation of lignin to aromatic monomers can lead to the derivation of commercially valuable products.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). U.S. Department of Energy’s Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Wisconsin Energy Institute
  2. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). U.S. Department of Energy’s Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Wisconsin Energy Institute and Department of Biochemistry
  3. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). U.S. Department of Energy’s Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Wisconsin Energy Institute and Department of Bacteriology
  4. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). U.S. Department of Energy’s Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Wisconsin Energy Institute and Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1393270
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1427583
Grant/Contract Number:  
FC02-07ER64494
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Current Opinion in Biotechnology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 45; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0958-1669
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 09 BIOMASS FUELS

Citation Formats

Gall, Daniel L., Ralph, John, Donohue, Timothy J., and Noguera, Daniel R. Biochemical transformation of lignin for deriving valued commodities from lignocellulose. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.copbio.2017.02.015.
Gall, Daniel L., Ralph, John, Donohue, Timothy J., & Noguera, Daniel R. Biochemical transformation of lignin for deriving valued commodities from lignocellulose. United States. doi:10.1016/j.copbio.2017.02.015.
Gall, Daniel L., Ralph, John, Donohue, Timothy J., and Noguera, Daniel R. Fri . "Biochemical transformation of lignin for deriving valued commodities from lignocellulose". United States. doi:10.1016/j.copbio.2017.02.015.
@article{osti_1393270,
title = {Biochemical transformation of lignin for deriving valued commodities from lignocellulose},
author = {Gall, Daniel L. and Ralph, John and Donohue, Timothy J. and Noguera, Daniel R.},
abstractNote = {The biochemical properties of lignin present major obstacles to deriving societally beneficial entities from lignocellulosic biomass, an abundant and renewable feedstock. Similar to other biopolymers such as polysaccharides, polypeptides, and ribonucleic acids, lignin polymers are derived from multiple types of monomeric units. However, lignin’s renowned recalcitrance is largely attributable to its racemic nature and the variety of covalent inter-unit linkages through which its aromatic monomers are linked. Indeed, unlike other biopolymers whose monomers are consistently inter-linked by a single type of covalent bond, the monomeric units in lignin are linked via non-enzymatic, combinatorial radical coupling reactions that give rise to a variety of inter-unit covalent bonds in mildly branched racemic polymers. Yet, despite the chemical complexity and stability of lignin, significant strides have been made in recent years to identify routes through which valued commodities can be derived from it. This paper discusses emerging biological and biochemical means through which degradation of lignin to aromatic monomers can lead to the derivation of commercially valuable products.},
doi = {10.1016/j.copbio.2017.02.015},
journal = {Current Opinion in Biotechnology},
number = C,
volume = 45,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 24 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Mar 24 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.copbio.2017.02.015

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 6 works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Save / Share: