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Title: Cow Power: A Case Study of Renewable Compressed Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel

Abstract

This case study explores the production and use of renewable compressed natural gas (R-CNG)—derived from the anaerobic digestion (AD) of dairy manure—to fuel 42 heavy-duty milk tanker trucks operating in Indiana, Michigan, Tennessee, and Kentucky.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V)
OSTI Identifier:
1392464
Report Number(s):
ANL/ESD-17/7
136102
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS

Citation Formats

Mintz, Marianne, and Tomich, Matthew. Cow Power: A Case Study of Renewable Compressed Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1392464.
Mintz, Marianne, & Tomich, Matthew. Cow Power: A Case Study of Renewable Compressed Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel. United States. doi:10.2172/1392464.
Mintz, Marianne, and Tomich, Matthew. 2017. "Cow Power: A Case Study of Renewable Compressed Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel". United States. doi:10.2172/1392464. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1392464.
@article{osti_1392464,
title = {Cow Power: A Case Study of Renewable Compressed Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel},
author = {Mintz, Marianne and Tomich, Matthew},
abstractNote = {This case study explores the production and use of renewable compressed natural gas (R-CNG)—derived from the anaerobic digestion (AD) of dairy manure—to fuel 42 heavy-duty milk tanker trucks operating in Indiana, Michigan, Tennessee, and Kentucky.},
doi = {10.2172/1392464},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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