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Title: Dynamic fracture of tantalum under extreme tensile stress

Abstract

The understanding of fracture phenomena of a material at extremely high strain rates is a key issue for a wide variety of scientific research ranging from applied science and technological developments to fundamental science such as laser-matter interaction and geology. Despite its interest, its study relies on a fine multiscale description, in between the atomic scale and macroscopic processes, so far only achievable by large-scale atomic simulations. Direct ultrafast real-time monitoring of dynamic fracture (spallation) at the atomic lattice scale with picosecond time resolution was beyond the reach of experimental techniques. We show that the coupling between a high-power optical laser pump pulse and a femtosecond x-ray probe pulse generated by an x-ray free electron laser allows detection of the lattice dynamics in a tantalum foil at an ultrahigh strain rate of Embedded Image ~2 × 10 8 to 3.5 × 10 8 s -1. A maximal density drop of 8 to 10%, associated with the onset of spallation at a spall strength of ~17 GPa, was directly measured using x-ray diffraction. The experimental results of density evolution agree well with large-scale atomistic simulations of shock wave propagation and fracture of the sample. Our experimental technique opens a new pathwaymore » to the investigation of ultrahigh strain-rate phenomena in materials at the atomic scale, including high-speed crack dynamics and stress-induced solid-solid phase transitions.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [3];  [2];  [2];  [4]; ORCiD logo [5];  [3]; ORCiD logo [3];  [6];  [7];  [8]; ORCiD logo [9]; ORCiD logo [10];  [4];  [2]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [11]; ORCiD logo [12];  [4] more »; ORCiD logo [9]; ORCiD logo [13];  [2];  [13];  [14];  [2];  [15];  [16];  [17];  [2]; ORCiD logo [2];  [18]; ORCiD logo [8]; ORCiD logo [8];  [15];  [19]; ORCiD logo [7];  [20];  [2];  [9];  [2] « less
  1. Osaka Univ. (Japan); Pierre and Marie Curie Univ., Paris (France)
  2. Osaka Univ. (Japan)
  3. Dukhov Research Inst. of Automatics, Moscow (Russia); Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Moscow (Russian Federation)
  4. Sorbonne Univ., Paris (France)
  5. Osaka Univ. (Japan); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, (Germany)
  6. Japan Synchreotron Radiation Research Inst., Sayo (Japan); RIKEN Center, Sayo (Japan)
  7. RIKEN Center, Sayo (Japan)
  8. Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Inst., Sayo (Japan); RIKEN Center, Sayo (Japan)
  9. Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Inst., Sayo (Japan)
  10. Pierre and Marie Curie Univ., Paris (France); Osaka Univ. (Japan)
  11. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); European X-ray Free-Electron Laser (XFEL), Schenefeld (Germany)
  12. Dukhov Research Inst. of Automatics, Moscow (Russia)
  13. Okayama Univ., Misasa (Japan)
  14. National Inst. for Materials Science (NIMS), Sayo (Japan). Synchrotron X-ray Station at Spring-8
  15. Hiroshima Univ. (Japan)
  16. Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research, Shanghai (China)
  17. Kobe Univ. (Japan)
  18. Ehime Univ., Matsuyama (Japan); Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Inst., Sayo (Japan)
  19. Pierre and Marie Curie Univ., Paris (France)
  20. RIKEN Center, Sayo (Japan); Osaka Univ. (Japan)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1390704
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515; ID0EPMFM18226; 16-08-01181
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Science Advances
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 3; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 2375-2548
Publisher:
AAAS
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Albertazzi, Bruno, Ozaki, Norimasa, Zhakhovsky, Vasily, Faenov, Anatoly, Habara, Hideaki, Harmand, Marion, Hartley, Nicholas, Ilnitsky, Denis, Inogamov, Nail, Inubushi, Yuichi, Ishikawa, Tetsuya, Katayama, Tetsuo, Koyama, Takahisa, Koenig, Michel, Krygier, Andrew, Matsuoka, Takeshi, Matsuyama, Satoshi, McBride, Emma, Migdal, Kirill Petrovich, Morard, Guillaume, Ohashi, Haruhiko, Okuchi, Takuo, Pikuz, Tatiana, Purevjav, Narangoo, Sakata, Osami, Sano, Yasuhisa, Sato, Tomoko, Sekine, Toshimori, Seto, Yusuke, Takahashi, Kenjiro, Tanaka, Kazuo, Tange, Yoshinori, Togashi, Tadashi, Tono, Kensuke, Umeda, Yuhei, Vinci, Tommaso, Yabashi, Makina, Yabuuchi, Toshinori, Yamauchi, Kazuto, Yumoto, Hirokatsu, and Kodama, Ryosuke. Dynamic fracture of tantalum under extreme tensile stress. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1126/sciadv.1602705.
Albertazzi, Bruno, Ozaki, Norimasa, Zhakhovsky, Vasily, Faenov, Anatoly, Habara, Hideaki, Harmand, Marion, Hartley, Nicholas, Ilnitsky, Denis, Inogamov, Nail, Inubushi, Yuichi, Ishikawa, Tetsuya, Katayama, Tetsuo, Koyama, Takahisa, Koenig, Michel, Krygier, Andrew, Matsuoka, Takeshi, Matsuyama, Satoshi, McBride, Emma, Migdal, Kirill Petrovich, Morard, Guillaume, Ohashi, Haruhiko, Okuchi, Takuo, Pikuz, Tatiana, Purevjav, Narangoo, Sakata, Osami, Sano, Yasuhisa, Sato, Tomoko, Sekine, Toshimori, Seto, Yusuke, Takahashi, Kenjiro, Tanaka, Kazuo, Tange, Yoshinori, Togashi, Tadashi, Tono, Kensuke, Umeda, Yuhei, Vinci, Tommaso, Yabashi, Makina, Yabuuchi, Toshinori, Yamauchi, Kazuto, Yumoto, Hirokatsu, & Kodama, Ryosuke. Dynamic fracture of tantalum under extreme tensile stress. United States. doi:10.1126/sciadv.1602705.
Albertazzi, Bruno, Ozaki, Norimasa, Zhakhovsky, Vasily, Faenov, Anatoly, Habara, Hideaki, Harmand, Marion, Hartley, Nicholas, Ilnitsky, Denis, Inogamov, Nail, Inubushi, Yuichi, Ishikawa, Tetsuya, Katayama, Tetsuo, Koyama, Takahisa, Koenig, Michel, Krygier, Andrew, Matsuoka, Takeshi, Matsuyama, Satoshi, McBride, Emma, Migdal, Kirill Petrovich, Morard, Guillaume, Ohashi, Haruhiko, Okuchi, Takuo, Pikuz, Tatiana, Purevjav, Narangoo, Sakata, Osami, Sano, Yasuhisa, Sato, Tomoko, Sekine, Toshimori, Seto, Yusuke, Takahashi, Kenjiro, Tanaka, Kazuo, Tange, Yoshinori, Togashi, Tadashi, Tono, Kensuke, Umeda, Yuhei, Vinci, Tommaso, Yabashi, Makina, Yabuuchi, Toshinori, Yamauchi, Kazuto, Yumoto, Hirokatsu, and Kodama, Ryosuke. Fri . "Dynamic fracture of tantalum under extreme tensile stress". United States. doi:10.1126/sciadv.1602705. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1390704.
@article{osti_1390704,
title = {Dynamic fracture of tantalum under extreme tensile stress},
author = {Albertazzi, Bruno and Ozaki, Norimasa and Zhakhovsky, Vasily and Faenov, Anatoly and Habara, Hideaki and Harmand, Marion and Hartley, Nicholas and Ilnitsky, Denis and Inogamov, Nail and Inubushi, Yuichi and Ishikawa, Tetsuya and Katayama, Tetsuo and Koyama, Takahisa and Koenig, Michel and Krygier, Andrew and Matsuoka, Takeshi and Matsuyama, Satoshi and McBride, Emma and Migdal, Kirill Petrovich and Morard, Guillaume and Ohashi, Haruhiko and Okuchi, Takuo and Pikuz, Tatiana and Purevjav, Narangoo and Sakata, Osami and Sano, Yasuhisa and Sato, Tomoko and Sekine, Toshimori and Seto, Yusuke and Takahashi, Kenjiro and Tanaka, Kazuo and Tange, Yoshinori and Togashi, Tadashi and Tono, Kensuke and Umeda, Yuhei and Vinci, Tommaso and Yabashi, Makina and Yabuuchi, Toshinori and Yamauchi, Kazuto and Yumoto, Hirokatsu and Kodama, Ryosuke},
abstractNote = {The understanding of fracture phenomena of a material at extremely high strain rates is a key issue for a wide variety of scientific research ranging from applied science and technological developments to fundamental science such as laser-matter interaction and geology. Despite its interest, its study relies on a fine multiscale description, in between the atomic scale and macroscopic processes, so far only achievable by large-scale atomic simulations. Direct ultrafast real-time monitoring of dynamic fracture (spallation) at the atomic lattice scale with picosecond time resolution was beyond the reach of experimental techniques. We show that the coupling between a high-power optical laser pump pulse and a femtosecond x-ray probe pulse generated by an x-ray free electron laser allows detection of the lattice dynamics in a tantalum foil at an ultrahigh strain rate of Embedded Image ~2 × 108 to 3.5 × 108 s-1. A maximal density drop of 8 to 10%, associated with the onset of spallation at a spall strength of ~17 GPa, was directly measured using x-ray diffraction. The experimental results of density evolution agree well with large-scale atomistic simulations of shock wave propagation and fracture of the sample. Our experimental technique opens a new pathway to the investigation of ultrahigh strain-rate phenomena in materials at the atomic scale, including high-speed crack dynamics and stress-induced solid-solid phase transitions.},
doi = {10.1126/sciadv.1602705},
journal = {Science Advances},
number = 6,
volume = 3,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jun 02 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Jun 02 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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