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Title: Charge transport network dynamics in molecular aggregates

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research Center (ANSER)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1388188
DOE Contract Number:
SC0001059
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America; Journal Volume: 113; Journal Issue: 31; Related Information: ANSER partners with Northwestern University (lead); Argonne National Laboratory; University of Chicago; University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Yale University
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
catalysis (homogeneous), catalysis (heterogeneous), solar (photovoltaic), solar (fuels), photosynthesis (natural and artificial), bio-inspired, hydrogen and fuel cells, electrodes - solar, defects, charge transport, spin dynamics, membrane, materials and chemistry by design, optics, synthesis (novel materials), synthesis (self-assembly)

Citation Formats

Jackson, Nicholas E., Chen, Lin X., and Ratner, Mark A.. Charge transport network dynamics in molecular aggregates. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1073/pnas.1601915113.
Jackson, Nicholas E., Chen, Lin X., & Ratner, Mark A.. Charge transport network dynamics in molecular aggregates. United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1601915113.
Jackson, Nicholas E., Chen, Lin X., and Ratner, Mark A.. 2016. "Charge transport network dynamics in molecular aggregates". United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1601915113.
@article{osti_1388188,
title = {Charge transport network dynamics in molecular aggregates},
author = {Jackson, Nicholas E. and Chen, Lin X. and Ratner, Mark A.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1073/pnas.1601915113},
journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
number = 31,
volume = 113,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
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