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Title: Substructural details of chemical driven shifts in the Nannochloropsis salina microbiota.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1376782
Report Number(s):
SAND2016-7994C
646687
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the 16th International Symposium on Microbial Ecology held August 20-27, 2016 in Montreal, Canada.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Geng, Haifeng, Tran-Gyamfi, Mary Bao, Sale, Kenneth L., and Lane, Todd. Substructural details of chemical driven shifts in the Nannochloropsis salina microbiota.. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Geng, Haifeng, Tran-Gyamfi, Mary Bao, Sale, Kenneth L., & Lane, Todd. Substructural details of chemical driven shifts in the Nannochloropsis salina microbiota.. United States.
Geng, Haifeng, Tran-Gyamfi, Mary Bao, Sale, Kenneth L., and Lane, Todd. Mon . "Substructural details of chemical driven shifts in the Nannochloropsis salina microbiota.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1376782.
@article{osti_1376782,
title = {Substructural details of chemical driven shifts in the Nannochloropsis salina microbiota.},
author = {Geng, Haifeng and Tran-Gyamfi, Mary Bao and Sale, Kenneth L. and Lane, Todd},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Conference:
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  • Here, large-scale open microalgae cultivation has tremendous potential to make a significant contribution to replacing petroleum-based fuels with biofuels. Open algal cultures are unavoidably inhabited with a diversity of microbes that live on, influence, and shape the fate of these ecosystems. However, there is little understanding of the resilience and stability of the microbial communities in engineered semicontinuous algal systems. To evaluate the dynamics and resilience of the microbial communities in microalgae biofuel cultures, we conducted a longitudinal study on open systems to compare the temporal profiles of the microbiota from two multigenerational algal cohorts, which include one seeded withmore » the microbiota from an in-house culture and the other exogenously seeded with a natural-occurring consortia of bacterial species harvested from the Pacific Ocean. From these month-long, semicontinuous open microalga Nannochloropsis salina cultures, we sequenced a time-series of 46 samples, yielding 8804 operational taxonomic units derived from 9,160,076 high-quality partial 16S rRNA sequences. We provide quantitative evidence that clearly illustrates the development of microbial community is associated with microbiota ancestry. In addition, N. salina growth phases were linked with distinct changes in microbial phylotypes. Alteromonadeles dominated the community in the N. salina exponential phase whereas Alphaproteobacteria and Flavobacteriia were more prevalent in the stationary phase. We also demonstrate that the N. salina-associated microbial community in open cultures is diverse, resilient, and dynamic in response to environmental perturbations. This knowledge has general implications for developing and testing design principles of cultivated algal systems.« less
  • Some conclusions of this paper are: (1) How much PW is available - (a) Lots, but probably not enough to support the largest estimates of algae production needed, (b) Diluent water is likely needed to support cultivation in some cases, (c) An assessment of how much PW is really available for use is needed; (2) Where is it available - (a) In many places near other resources (land, CO{sub 2}, sunlight, nutrients) and infrastructure (pipelines, refineries, disposal operations/wells); (3) Is the water chemistry acceptable for use - (a) Yes, in many cases with minimal treatment, (b) Additional constituents of valuemore » exist in PW for media; (4) Does it need treatment prior to use - (a) Yes, it may often need treatment for organics, some metals, and biological contaminants, (b) Source control and monitoring can reduce need for treatment; (5) How much does it cost to treat it - (a) If desalination is not needed, from <$0.01-$0.60 per m3 is a starting estimate; and (6) Can you grow algae in it - (a) Yes, but we need more experimentation to optimize field conditions, media mixing, and algae types.« less
  • Abstract not provided.