skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Polyacrylonitrile nanocomposite fibers from acrylonitrile-grafted carbon nanofibers

Abstract

For the first time, uniform distribution of surface functionalized carbon nanofibers (CNFs) has been achieved in low molecular weight (≈120,000 g/mol) textile grade-polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based composite filaments. Furthermore, surface grafting of CNFs with acrylonitrile enhances the dispersion of nanofibers in PAN fiber matrix. XPS study reveals high atomic nitrogen content (7%) on the CNF surface due to the grafting reaction. The solution-spun filaments have been characterized for distribution of CNFs in the PAN matrix by electron microscopy. PAN composite filaments containing 3.2 wt.% CNF and processed at draw ratio of ≈6.3 exhibit enhanced tensile strength and modulus by more than three folds compared to the control PAN filament. Because of chemically compatible surface modification of the nanofibers, better dispersion and improved mechanical properties were accomplished in the reinforced PAN fibers. This should then allow the production of CNF reinforced carbon fibers with improved tensile properties. An increase in CNF loading (6.4 wt.%), however, reduced performance due to inefficient alignment of CNF along the fiber axis. Nevertheless, hot stretching (at draw ratio ≈ 10) of the filaments enhanced tensile strength and elastic modulus of PAN composite filaments by 20–30% compared to the control hot stretched PAN filaments.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [3];  [4];  [1]
  1. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
  2. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Inst. for Advanced Studies and Dept. of Aerospace Science and Technology (IEAV/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil)
  3. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  4. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1376653
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Composites. Part B, Engineering
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 130; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 1359-8368
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Hiremath, Nitilaksha, Evora, Maria Cecilia, Naskar, Amit K., Mays, Jimmy, and Bhat, Gajanan. Polyacrylonitrile nanocomposite fibers from acrylonitrile-grafted carbon nanofibers. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.compositesb.2017.07.031.
Hiremath, Nitilaksha, Evora, Maria Cecilia, Naskar, Amit K., Mays, Jimmy, & Bhat, Gajanan. Polyacrylonitrile nanocomposite fibers from acrylonitrile-grafted carbon nanofibers. United States. doi:10.1016/j.compositesb.2017.07.031.
Hiremath, Nitilaksha, Evora, Maria Cecilia, Naskar, Amit K., Mays, Jimmy, and Bhat, Gajanan. 2017. "Polyacrylonitrile nanocomposite fibers from acrylonitrile-grafted carbon nanofibers". United States. doi:10.1016/j.compositesb.2017.07.031.
@article{osti_1376653,
title = {Polyacrylonitrile nanocomposite fibers from acrylonitrile-grafted carbon nanofibers},
author = {Hiremath, Nitilaksha and Evora, Maria Cecilia and Naskar, Amit K. and Mays, Jimmy and Bhat, Gajanan},
abstractNote = {For the first time, uniform distribution of surface functionalized carbon nanofibers (CNFs) has been achieved in low molecular weight (≈120,000 g/mol) textile grade-polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based composite filaments. Furthermore, surface grafting of CNFs with acrylonitrile enhances the dispersion of nanofibers in PAN fiber matrix. XPS study reveals high atomic nitrogen content (7%) on the CNF surface due to the grafting reaction. The solution-spun filaments have been characterized for distribution of CNFs in the PAN matrix by electron microscopy. PAN composite filaments containing 3.2 wt.% CNF and processed at draw ratio of ≈6.3 exhibit enhanced tensile strength and modulus by more than three folds compared to the control PAN filament. Because of chemically compatible surface modification of the nanofibers, better dispersion and improved mechanical properties were accomplished in the reinforced PAN fibers. This should then allow the production of CNF reinforced carbon fibers with improved tensile properties. An increase in CNF loading (6.4 wt.%), however, reduced performance due to inefficient alignment of CNF along the fiber axis. Nevertheless, hot stretching (at draw ratio ≈ 10) of the filaments enhanced tensile strength and elastic modulus of PAN composite filaments by 20–30% compared to the control hot stretched PAN filaments.},
doi = {10.1016/j.compositesb.2017.07.031},
journal = {Composites. Part B, Engineering},
number = C,
volume = 130,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on July 31, 2018
Publisher's Version of Record

Save / Share: