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Title: Analysis of Transportation Options for Commercial Spent Fuel in the U.S.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Fuel Cycle Technologies (NE-5)
OSTI Identifier:
1375594
Report Number(s):
SAND2016-7819C
646560
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Materials (PATRAM) held September 18-23, 2016 in Kobe, Japan.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Kalinina, Elena Arkadievna, and Busch, Ingrid K. Analysis of Transportation Options for Commercial Spent Fuel in the U.S.. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Kalinina, Elena Arkadievna, & Busch, Ingrid K. Analysis of Transportation Options for Commercial Spent Fuel in the U.S.. United States.
Kalinina, Elena Arkadievna, and Busch, Ingrid K. 2016. "Analysis of Transportation Options for Commercial Spent Fuel in the U.S.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1375594.
@article{osti_1375594,
title = {Analysis of Transportation Options for Commercial Spent Fuel in the U.S.},
author = {Kalinina, Elena Arkadievna and Busch, Ingrid K.},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

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  • The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S.more » Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is laying the groundwork for implementing interim storage and associated transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) highand associated transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high and associated transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) highand associated transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high and associated transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) highand associated transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and highand associated transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high and associated transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) high and associated transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) high and associated transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) high and associated transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) high and associated transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) high and associated transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) high and associated transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) highand associated transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high and associated transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) high and associated transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) highand associated transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF)...« less
  • Abstract not provided.
  • This paper gives the results of estimates of aggregated radiation doses to the affected public and workers in the US that would be associated with loading spent fuel at the reactors, transporting the spent fuel by truck and rail, and receiving and unloading the spent fuel at a deep geological repository. The estimates are for a postulated transportation-related system using current state-of-the-art technology, if employed in the high-level waste management system in the future, and the approximate dose reduction from some potential system improvements. The results of the study provide a starting point for the US Department of Energy (DOE)more » to develop an improved transportation system that is cost effective, safe, and results in low radiation doses. 4 refs., 1 figs., 5 tabs.« less
  • Multiple design and usage options exist for packagings to transport spent fuel and high-level waste. The purpose of this paper is to list many of these options and to review their merits. Parameters considered include cask usage and designs, vehicles, handling methods, gamma neutron shielding materials impact limiters, and truck system weight limits.
  • Radioactive materials transportation is stringently regulated by the Department of Transportation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to protect the public and the environment. As a Federal agency, however, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) must seek State, Tribal and local input on safety issues for certain transportation activities. This interaction has invariably resulted in the imposition of extra-regulatory requirements, greatly increasing transportation costs and delaying schedules while not significantly enhancing the level of safety. This paper discusses the results an analysis of the regulatory and negotiated requirements established for a July 1998 shipment of spent nuclear fuel from foreign countriesmore » through the west coast to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Staff from the INEEL Nuclear Materials Engineering and Disposition Department undertook the analysis in partnership with HMTC, to discover if there were instances where requirements derived from stakeholder interactions duplicate, contradict, or otherwise overlap with regulatory requirements. The study exhaustively lists and classifies applicable Department of Transportation (DOT) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. These are then compared with a similarly classified list of requirements from the Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) and those developed during stakeholder negotiations. Comparison and analysis reveals numerous attempts to reduce transportation risk by imposing more stringent safety measures than those required by DOT and NRC. These usually took the form of additional inspection, notification and planning requirements. There are also many instances of overlap with, and duplication of regulations. Participants will gain a greater appreciation for the need to understand the risk-oriented basis of the radioactive materials regulations and their effectiveness in ensuring safety when negotiating extra-regulatory requirements.« less