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Title: Quantitative assessment of AOD from 17 CMIP5 models based on satellite-derived AOD over India

Abstract

Aerosol optical depth (AOD) values from 17 CMIP5 models are compared with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) derived AODs over India. The objective is to identify the cases of successful AOD simulation by CMIP5 models, considering satellite-derived AOD as a benchmark. Six years of AOD data (2000–2005) from MISR and MODIS are processed to create quality-assured gridded AOD maps over India, which are compared with corresponding maps of 17 CMIP5 models at the same grid resolution. Intercomparison of model and satellite data shows that model-AOD is better correlated with MISR-derived AOD than MODIS. The correlation between model-AOD and MISR-AOD is used to segregate the models into three categories identifying their performance in simulating the AOD over India. Maps of correlation between model-AOD and MISR-/MODIS-AOD are generated to provide quantitative information about the intercomparison. The two sets of data are examined for different seasons and years to examine the seasonal and interannual variation in the correlation coefficients. In conclusion, latitudinal and longitudinal variations in AOD as simulated by models are also examined and compared with corresponding variations observed by satellites.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur (India)
  2. Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur (India); Univ. of Hyderabad, Hyderabad (India)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur (India). Dept. of Civil Engineering
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1375420
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Annales Geophysicae (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Annales Geophysicae (Online); Journal Volume: 34; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 1432-0576
Publisher:
European Geophysical Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; atmospheric; composition and structure; (aerosols and particles)

Citation Formats

Misra, Amit, Kanawade, Vijay P., and Tripathi, Sachchida Nand. Quantitative assessment of AOD from 17 CMIP5 models based on satellite-derived AOD over India. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.5194/angeo-34-657-2016.
Misra, Amit, Kanawade, Vijay P., & Tripathi, Sachchida Nand. Quantitative assessment of AOD from 17 CMIP5 models based on satellite-derived AOD over India. United States. doi:10.5194/angeo-34-657-2016.
Misra, Amit, Kanawade, Vijay P., and Tripathi, Sachchida Nand. 2016. "Quantitative assessment of AOD from 17 CMIP5 models based on satellite-derived AOD over India". United States. doi:10.5194/angeo-34-657-2016. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1375420.
@article{osti_1375420,
title = {Quantitative assessment of AOD from 17 CMIP5 models based on satellite-derived AOD over India},
author = {Misra, Amit and Kanawade, Vijay P. and Tripathi, Sachchida Nand},
abstractNote = {Aerosol optical depth (AOD) values from 17 CMIP5 models are compared with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) derived AODs over India. The objective is to identify the cases of successful AOD simulation by CMIP5 models, considering satellite-derived AOD as a benchmark. Six years of AOD data (2000–2005) from MISR and MODIS are processed to create quality-assured gridded AOD maps over India, which are compared with corresponding maps of 17 CMIP5 models at the same grid resolution. Intercomparison of model and satellite data shows that model-AOD is better correlated with MISR-derived AOD than MODIS. The correlation between model-AOD and MISR-AOD is used to segregate the models into three categories identifying their performance in simulating the AOD over India. Maps of correlation between model-AOD and MISR-/MODIS-AOD are generated to provide quantitative information about the intercomparison. The two sets of data are examined for different seasons and years to examine the seasonal and interannual variation in the correlation coefficients. In conclusion, latitudinal and longitudinal variations in AOD as simulated by models are also examined and compared with corresponding variations observed by satellites.},
doi = {10.5194/angeo-34-657-2016},
journal = {Annales Geophysicae (Online)},
number = 8,
volume = 34,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
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