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Title: Removal or storage of environmental pollutants and alternative fuel sources with inorganic adsorbents via host–guest encapsulation

Abstract

The ever-increasing demands of the modern world continue to place substantial strain on the environment. To help alleviate the damage done to the natural world, the encapsulation of small molecules or ions (guests) into porous inorganic structural frameworks (hosts) provides a potential remedy for some of the environmental concerns facing us today. These concerns include the removal of harmful pollutants from water or air, the safe entrapment of nuclear waste materials, or the purification and storage of small molecules that act as alternative fuel sources. For this study, we review the trends in using inorganic materials as hostmedia for the removal or storage of various wastes and alternative fuels. In conclusion, we cover the treatment of water contaminated with dyes or heavy metals, air pollution alleviation via CO 2, SO x, NO x, and volatile organic compound containment, nuclear waste immobilization, and storage for H 2 and methane as alternative fuels.

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Cavendish Lab. Department of Physics
  2. Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Cavendish Lab. Department of Physics; Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (United Kingdom). ISIS Neutron and Muon Source; Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology; Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1374716
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Materials Chemistry. A
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 5; Journal Issue: 22; Journal ID: ISSN 2050-7488
Publisher:
Royal Society of Chemistry
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES

Citation Formats

Cramer, Alisha J., and Cole, Jacqueline M. Removal or storage of environmental pollutants and alternative fuel sources with inorganic adsorbents via host–guest encapsulation. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1039/c7ta02401k.
Cramer, Alisha J., & Cole, Jacqueline M. Removal or storage of environmental pollutants and alternative fuel sources with inorganic adsorbents via host–guest encapsulation. United States. doi:10.1039/c7ta02401k.
Cramer, Alisha J., and Cole, Jacqueline M. 2017. "Removal or storage of environmental pollutants and alternative fuel sources with inorganic adsorbents via host–guest encapsulation". United States. doi:10.1039/c7ta02401k.
@article{osti_1374716,
title = {Removal or storage of environmental pollutants and alternative fuel sources with inorganic adsorbents via host–guest encapsulation},
author = {Cramer, Alisha J. and Cole, Jacqueline M.},
abstractNote = {The ever-increasing demands of the modern world continue to place substantial strain on the environment. To help alleviate the damage done to the natural world, the encapsulation of small molecules or ions (guests) into porous inorganic structural frameworks (hosts) provides a potential remedy for some of the environmental concerns facing us today. These concerns include the removal of harmful pollutants from water or air, the safe entrapment of nuclear waste materials, or the purification and storage of small molecules that act as alternative fuel sources. For this study, we review the trends in using inorganic materials as hostmedia for the removal or storage of various wastes and alternative fuels. In conclusion, we cover the treatment of water contaminated with dyes or heavy metals, air pollution alleviation via CO2, SOx, NOx, and volatile organic compound containment, nuclear waste immobilization, and storage for H2 and methane as alternative fuels.},
doi = {10.1039/c7ta02401k},
journal = {Journal of Materials Chemistry. A},
number = 22,
volume = 5,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on May 8, 2018
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  • ABSTRACT This review article evaluates the structure–property relations of inorganic clathrates and clathrate hydrates and their potential role in energy harvesting. There is potential cross-fertilization between the two research areas. Guest–host clathrate compounds exhibit unique structural and physical properties, which lead to their versatile roles in energy applications. Prominent classes of clathrate compounds are gas hydrates and inorganic clathrates. That said, there is limited cross-fertilization between the clathrate hydrate and inorganic clathrate communities, with researchers in the respective fields being less informed on the other field. Yet the structures and unique guest–host interactions in both these compounds are common importantmore » features of these clathrates. Common features and procedures can inspire and inform development between the compound classes, which may be important to the technological advancements for the different clathrate materials, e.g., structure characterization techniques and guest–host dynamics in which the “guest” tends to be imprisoned in the host structure, until external forces are applied. Conversely, the diversity in chemical compositions of these two classes of materials leads to the different applications from methane capture and storage to converting waste heat to electricity (thermoelectrics). This article highlights the structural and physical similarities and differences of inorganic and methane clathrates. The most promising state-of-the-art applications of the clathrates are highlighted for harvesting energy from methane (clathrate) hydrate deposits under the ocean and for inorganic clathrates as promising thermoelectric materials.« less
  • ABSTRACT This review article evaluates the structure–property relations of inorganic clathrates and clathrate hydrates and their potential role in energy harvesting. There is potential cross-fertilization between the two research areas. Guest–host clathrate compounds exhibit unique structural and physical properties, which lead to their versatile roles in energy applications. Prominent classes of clathrate compounds are gas hydrates and inorganic clathrates. That said, there is limited cross-fertilization between the clathrate hydrate and inorganic clathrate communities, with researchers in the respective fields being less informed on the other field. Yet the structures and unique guest–host interactions in both these compounds are common importantmore » features of these clathrates. Common features and procedures can inspire and inform development between the compound classes, which may be important to the technological advancements for the different clathrate materials, e.g., structure characterization techniques and guest–host dynamics in which the “guest” tends to be imprisoned in the host structure, until external forces are applied. Conversely, the diversity in chemical compositions of these two classes of materials leads to the different applications from methane capture and storage to converting waste heat to electricity (thermoelectrics). This article highlights the structural and physical similarities and differences of inorganic and methane clathrates. The most promising state-of-the-art applications of the clathrates are highlighted for harvesting energy from methane (clathrate) hydrate deposits under the ocean and for inorganic clathrates as promising thermoelectric materials.« less
  • Macro- and mesoporous carbon samples have been prepared from both natural and synthetic sources. These natural and synthetic carbons (along with other microporous samples) have been characterized, with composition, thermal decomposition mode and stability (in inert and oxidizing atmospheres), and surface properties determined in each case. Order of thermal stability, porosity, and surface area have been determined, with carbons prepared from natural and synthetic sources exhibiting different thermal decomposition modes. Differences in surface area were attributed to differences in porosity, based on micropore and total pore volume. The adsorption of a series of quaternary ammonium (QA) compounds, dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide, tetradecyltrimethylammoniummore » bromide, and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide, onto macroporous and microporous carbons was also investigated using Fourier transform infrared/attenuated total reflection spectroscopy. QA removal was found to increase with increase in carbon chain length, with results indicating that the nature of the carbon adsorbent (with respect to surface area and microporosity) had little influence on QA uptake.« less
  • The understanding and eventual control of guest molecule transport in gas hydrates is of central importance for the efficient synthesis and processing of these materials for applications in the storage, separation, and sequestration of gases and natural gas production. Previously, some links have been established between dynamics of the host water molecules and guest-host hydrogen bonding interactions, but direct observation of transport in the form of cage-to-cage guest diffusion is still lacking. Recent calculations have suggested that pairs of different guest molecules in neighboring cages can affect guest-host hydrogen bonding and, therefore, defect injection and water lattice motions. We havemore » chosen two sets of hydrate guest pairs, tetrahydrofuran (THF)-CO{sub 2} and isobutane-CO{sub 2}, that are predicted to enhance or to diminish guest–host hydrogen bonding interactions as compared to those in pure CO{sub 2} hydrate and we have studied guest dynamics in each using {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. In addition, we have obtained the crystal structure of the THF-CO{sub 2} sII hydrate using the combined single crystal X-ray diffraction and {sup 13}C NMR powder pattern data and have performed molecular dynamics-simulation of the CO{sub 2} dynamics. The NMR powder line shape studies confirm the enhanced and delayed dynamics for the THF and isobutane containing hydrates, respectively, as compared to those in the CO{sub 2} hydrate. In addition, from line shape studies and 2D exchange spectroscopy NMR, we observe cage-to-cage exchange of CO{sub 2} molecules in the THF-CO{sub 2} hydrate, but not in the other hydrates studied. We conclude that the relatively rapid intercage guest dynamics are the result of synergistic guest A–host water–guest B interactions, thus allowing tuning of the guest transport properties in the hydrates by choice of the appropriate guest molecules. Our experimental value for inter-cage hopping is slower by a factor of 10{sup 6} than a published calculated value.« less