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Title: Vibro-acoustic Imaging at the Breazeale Reactor

Abstract

The INL is developing Vibro-acoustic imaging technology to characterize microstructure in fuels and materials in spent fuel pools and within reactor vessels. A vibro-acoustic development laboratory has been established at the INL. The progress in developing the vibro-acoustic technology at the INL is the focus of this report. A successful technology demonstration was performed in a working TRIGA research reactor. Vibro-acoustic imaging was performed in the reactor pool of the Breazeale reactor in late September of 2015. A confocal transducer driven at a nominal 3 MHz was used to collect the 60 kHz differential beat frequency induced in a spent TRIGA fuel rod and empty gamma tube located in the main reactor water pool. Data was collected and analyzed with the INLDAS data acquisition software using a short time Fourier transform.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1374499
Report Number(s):
INL/EXT-16-40000
DOE Contract Number:
AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; Breazeale Reactor; Vibro-acoustic Imaging

Citation Formats

Smith, James Arthur, Jewell, James Keith, and Lee, James Edwin. Vibro-acoustic Imaging at the Breazeale Reactor. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1374499.
Smith, James Arthur, Jewell, James Keith, & Lee, James Edwin. Vibro-acoustic Imaging at the Breazeale Reactor. United States. doi:10.2172/1374499.
Smith, James Arthur, Jewell, James Keith, and Lee, James Edwin. 2016. "Vibro-acoustic Imaging at the Breazeale Reactor". United States. doi:10.2172/1374499. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1374499.
@article{osti_1374499,
title = {Vibro-acoustic Imaging at the Breazeale Reactor},
author = {Smith, James Arthur and Jewell, James Keith and Lee, James Edwin},
abstractNote = {The INL is developing Vibro-acoustic imaging technology to characterize microstructure in fuels and materials in spent fuel pools and within reactor vessels. A vibro-acoustic development laboratory has been established at the INL. The progress in developing the vibro-acoustic technology at the INL is the focus of this report. A successful technology demonstration was performed in a working TRIGA research reactor. Vibro-acoustic imaging was performed in the reactor pool of the Breazeale reactor in late September of 2015. A confocal transducer driven at a nominal 3 MHz was used to collect the 60 kHz differential beat frequency induced in a spent TRIGA fuel rod and empty gamma tube located in the main reactor water pool. Data was collected and analyzed with the INLDAS data acquisition software using a short time Fourier transform.},
doi = {10.2172/1374499},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:

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  • The Vibro-Acoustic Measurement System is a distributed computer network designed for monitoring environmental motions. The heart of the system is a master-control unit to centrally manage the network as well as to continually record data. Closely coupled to the master is an array processor for the massively parallel data processing required in digital signal processing. Five slave units are coupled to the master. Each slave can handle 16 sensors; the system capacity is 80 channels. The network will function using only one voice-grade telephone line between the master and each slave.
  • NuSTAR is a satellite that will be carrying X-ray optics that consist of many nested glass cylinders. Due to different acoustic environments, the glass may react such that cracks and/or fractures may form. Cracks and/or fractures in the glass would not allow the optic to work properly. Therefore, it is necessary to test the glass and optic prototypes to determine if they will be able to withhold when experiencing certain acoustic environments. The vibro-acoustic testing conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena determined that under the minimum workmanship acoustic environments, the glass on the optics will not fail.more » Overall, the results of the test were successful which gives confidence that when the satellite is launched into the air and then dropped into space, the glass in the optics will not fail.« less
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  • Laboratory experiments have suggested that thermoacoustic engines can be in- corporated within nuclear fuel rods. Such engines would radiate sounds that could be used to measure and acoustically-telemeter information about the op- eration of the nuclear reactor (e.g., coolant temperature or uxes of neutrons or other energetic particles) or the physical condition of the nuclear fuel itself (e.g., changes in temperature, evolved gases) that are encoded as the frequency and/or amplitude of the radiated sound [IEEE Measurement and Instrumen- tation 16(3), 18-25 (2013)]. For such acoustic information to be detectable, it is important to characterize the vibroacoustical environments within reactors.more » Measurements will be presented of the background noise spectra (with and with- out coolant pumps) and reverberation times within the 70,000 gallon pool that cools and shields the fuel in the 1 MW research reactor on Penn State's campus using two hydrophones, a piezoelectric projector, and an accelerometer. Sev- eral signal-processing techniques will be demonstrated to enhance the measured results. Background vibrational measurement were also taken at the 250 MW Advanced Test Reactor, located at the Idaho National Laboratory, using ac- celerometers mounted outside the reactor's pressure vessel and on plumbing will also be presented. The detectability predictions made in the thesis were validated in September 2015 using a nuclear ssion-heated thermoacoustic sensor that was placed in the core of the Breazeale Nuclear Reactor on Penn State's campus. Some features of the thermoacoustic device used in that experiment will also be revealed. [Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.]« less
  • Activities are described under the headings of personnel; administration; facility operation; education and training; radionuclear applications laboratory; facility research utilization; and theses, publications, and reports. (DG)