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Title: Using the Cosmogenic Muon Background for Continuous Status-of-Health Monitoring of Neutron Detectors.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1373993
Report Number(s):
SAND2016-7303C
646219
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the INMM 57th Annual Meeting held July 25-28, 2016 in Atlanta, GA.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Kiff, Scott, Marleau, Peter, and Grimes, Thomas. Using the Cosmogenic Muon Background for Continuous Status-of-Health Monitoring of Neutron Detectors.. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Kiff, Scott, Marleau, Peter, & Grimes, Thomas. Using the Cosmogenic Muon Background for Continuous Status-of-Health Monitoring of Neutron Detectors.. United States.
Kiff, Scott, Marleau, Peter, and Grimes, Thomas. 2016. "Using the Cosmogenic Muon Background for Continuous Status-of-Health Monitoring of Neutron Detectors.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1373993.
@article{osti_1373993,
title = {Using the Cosmogenic Muon Background for Continuous Status-of-Health Monitoring of Neutron Detectors.},
author = {Kiff, Scott and Marleau, Peter and Grimes, Thomas},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Conference:
Other availability
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