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Title: (Pentamethylcyclopentadienato)rhodium complexes for delivery of the curcumin anticancer drug [Rhodium pentamethylcyclopentadienato complexes for delivery of the curcumin anti-cancer drug]

Abstract

[RhIII(*Cp)Cl(X,Y)] n+ complexes {X, Y = Cl, PTA, n = 0 (2); X, Y = en, n = 1 (3, Cl– salt; 4, PF 6– salt); X, Y = acac, n = 0 (5); X, Y = cur, n = 0 (6), where *Cp = pentamethylcyclopentadienato, curH = curcumin; PTA = 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphatricyclo[3.3.1.1]decane; en = 1,2-ethanediamine; acac = acetylacetonato = 2,4-pentanedionato(1–)} were synthesized from [Rh(*Cp)(µ-Cl)Cl] 2 (1). While 2–5 were inactive against human epithelial A549 lung-cancer cells in assays of cytotoxicity, and antimetastatic and proapoptotic behaviors, 6 had a cytotoxic activity similar to that of curH over 72 h, but at 24 h in real-time cell migration assays, it was less active, showing slow release of curH. All complexes underwent ligand-exchange reactions with biomolecules and cells within the timeframes of the assays (X-ray absorption spectroscopy). Intracellular elemental distributions (X-ray fluorescence microscopy) showed that 6 effectively delivered curH to cells, where it was released. Other elemental distributions and caspase activities were consistent with preapoptotic activities. As such, 6 is a promising delivery agent for bioactive ligands, such as curH. However, pure curcumin itself showed a previously unrecognized ability to promote migration of A549 cells at subtoxic concentrations in the presence of endothelialmore » growth factor, which may be a concern for its widespread use as a nutritional supplement and as a potential drug. As a result, this aspect warrants further research.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. The Univ. of Sydney, NSW (Australia)
  2. Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, VIC (Australia)
  3. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Lemont, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1371909
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1401271
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2017; Journal Issue: 12; Journal ID: ISSN 1434-1948
Publisher:
ChemPubSoc Europe
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; X-ray absorption spectroscopy; X-ray fluorescence microscopy; curcumin; cytotoxicity; rhodium pentamethylcyclopentadienyl complexes

Citation Formats

Markham, Jack, Liang, Jun, Levina, Aviva, Mak, Rachel, Johannessen, Bernt, Kappen, Peter, Glover, Chris J., Lai, Barry, Vogt, Stefan, and Lay, Peter A. (Pentamethylcyclopentadienato)rhodium complexes for delivery of the curcumin anticancer drug [Rhodium pentamethylcyclopentadienato complexes for delivery of the curcumin anti-cancer drug]. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/ejic.201601331.
Markham, Jack, Liang, Jun, Levina, Aviva, Mak, Rachel, Johannessen, Bernt, Kappen, Peter, Glover, Chris J., Lai, Barry, Vogt, Stefan, & Lay, Peter A. (Pentamethylcyclopentadienato)rhodium complexes for delivery of the curcumin anticancer drug [Rhodium pentamethylcyclopentadienato complexes for delivery of the curcumin anti-cancer drug]. United States. doi:10.1002/ejic.201601331.
Markham, Jack, Liang, Jun, Levina, Aviva, Mak, Rachel, Johannessen, Bernt, Kappen, Peter, Glover, Chris J., Lai, Barry, Vogt, Stefan, and Lay, Peter A. Mon . "(Pentamethylcyclopentadienato)rhodium complexes for delivery of the curcumin anticancer drug [Rhodium pentamethylcyclopentadienato complexes for delivery of the curcumin anti-cancer drug]". United States. doi:10.1002/ejic.201601331. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1371909.
@article{osti_1371909,
title = {(Pentamethylcyclopentadienato)rhodium complexes for delivery of the curcumin anticancer drug [Rhodium pentamethylcyclopentadienato complexes for delivery of the curcumin anti-cancer drug]},
author = {Markham, Jack and Liang, Jun and Levina, Aviva and Mak, Rachel and Johannessen, Bernt and Kappen, Peter and Glover, Chris J. and Lai, Barry and Vogt, Stefan and Lay, Peter A.},
abstractNote = {[RhIII(*Cp)Cl(X,Y)]n+ complexes {X, Y = Cl, PTA, n = 0 (2); X, Y = en, n = 1 (3, Cl– salt; 4, PF6– salt); X, Y = acac, n = 0 (5); X, Y = cur, n = 0 (6), where *Cp = pentamethylcyclopentadienato, curH = curcumin; PTA = 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphatricyclo[3.3.1.1]decane; en = 1,2-ethanediamine; acac = acetylacetonato = 2,4-pentanedionato(1–)} were synthesized from [Rh(*Cp)(µ-Cl)Cl]2 (1). While 2–5 were inactive against human epithelial A549 lung-cancer cells in assays of cytotoxicity, and antimetastatic and proapoptotic behaviors, 6 had a cytotoxic activity similar to that of curH over 72 h, but at 24 h in real-time cell migration assays, it was less active, showing slow release of curH. All complexes underwent ligand-exchange reactions with biomolecules and cells within the timeframes of the assays (X-ray absorption spectroscopy). Intracellular elemental distributions (X-ray fluorescence microscopy) showed that 6 effectively delivered curH to cells, where it was released. Other elemental distributions and caspase activities were consistent with preapoptotic activities. As such, 6 is a promising delivery agent for bioactive ligands, such as curH. However, pure curcumin itself showed a previously unrecognized ability to promote migration of A549 cells at subtoxic concentrations in the presence of endothelial growth factor, which may be a concern for its widespread use as a nutritional supplement and as a potential drug. As a result, this aspect warrants further research.},
doi = {10.1002/ejic.201601331},
journal = {European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry},
number = 12,
volume = 2017,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 23 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Jan 23 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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