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Title: Select fire perforating system application in Norway

Abstract

Phillips Petroleum Co. Norway, used the special features of the Halliburton Selector Fire (HSF) System to perforate selected reservoir sections over very long intervals in horizontal wells in Greater Ekofisk Area fields in the Norwegian North Sea. Basic operations of the tool and three case history applications were presented at Offshore Europe `95 in Aberdeen by E. Kleepa and R. Nilson, Halliburton Norway (Inc.) and K. Bersaas, Phillips Petroleum Co. Norway, in paper SPE 30409 ``Tubing conveyed perforating in the Greater Ekofisk Area using the Halliburton Select Fire System.`` Highlights are summarized here.

Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
137134
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: World Oil; Journal Volume: 216; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: PBD: Nov 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; OIL WELLS; PERFORATION; TOOLS; DESIGN; NORTH SEA; NORWAY; PERFORMANCE; SPECIFICATIONS; DIRECTIONAL DRILLING

Citation Formats

NONE. Select fire perforating system application in Norway. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
NONE. Select fire perforating system application in Norway. United States.
NONE. 1995. "Select fire perforating system application in Norway". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_137134,
title = {Select fire perforating system application in Norway},
author = {NONE},
abstractNote = {Phillips Petroleum Co. Norway, used the special features of the Halliburton Selector Fire (HSF) System to perforate selected reservoir sections over very long intervals in horizontal wells in Greater Ekofisk Area fields in the Norwegian North Sea. Basic operations of the tool and three case history applications were presented at Offshore Europe `95 in Aberdeen by E. Kleepa and R. Nilson, Halliburton Norway (Inc.) and K. Bersaas, Phillips Petroleum Co. Norway, in paper SPE 30409 ``Tubing conveyed perforating in the Greater Ekofisk Area using the Halliburton Select Fire System.`` Highlights are summarized here.},
doi = {},
journal = {World Oil},
number = 11,
volume = 216,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month =
}
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