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Title: Unsteady drag following shock wave impingement on a dense particle curtain measured using pulse-burst PIV

Abstract

High-speed, time-resolved particle image velocimetry with a pulse-burst laser was used to measure the gas-phase velocity upstream and downstream of a shock wave–particle curtain interaction at three shock Mach numbers (1.22, 1.40, and 1.45) at a repetition rate of 37.5 kHz. The particle curtain was formed from free-falling soda-lime particles resulting in volume fractions of 9% or 23% at mid-height, depending on particle diameter (106–125 and 300–355 μm, respectively). Following impingement by a shock wave, a pressure difference was created between the upstream and downstream sides of the curtain, which accelerated flow through the curtain. Jetting of flow through the curtain was observed downstream once deformation of the curtain began, demonstrating a long-term unsteady effect. Using a control volume approach, the unsteady drag on the curtain was estimated from velocity and pressure data. The drag imposed on the curtain has a strong volume fraction dependence with a prolonged unsteadiness following initial shock impingement. Additionally, the data suggest that the resulting pressure difference following the propagation of the reflected and transmitted shock waves is the primary component to curtain drag.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); The State Univ. of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States)
  2. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1369445
Report Number(s):
SAND-2016-9476J
Journal ID: ISSN 2469-990X; 647669
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Physical Review Fluids
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 2469-990X
Publisher:
American Physical Society (APS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS

Citation Formats

DeMauro, Edward Paisley, Wagner, Justin L., Beresh, Steven J., and Farias, Paul Abraham. Unsteady drag following shock wave impingement on a dense particle curtain measured using pulse-burst PIV. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevFluids.2.064301.
DeMauro, Edward Paisley, Wagner, Justin L., Beresh, Steven J., & Farias, Paul Abraham. Unsteady drag following shock wave impingement on a dense particle curtain measured using pulse-burst PIV. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevFluids.2.064301.
DeMauro, Edward Paisley, Wagner, Justin L., Beresh, Steven J., and Farias, Paul Abraham. 2017. "Unsteady drag following shock wave impingement on a dense particle curtain measured using pulse-burst PIV". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevFluids.2.064301.
@article{osti_1369445,
title = {Unsteady drag following shock wave impingement on a dense particle curtain measured using pulse-burst PIV},
author = {DeMauro, Edward Paisley and Wagner, Justin L. and Beresh, Steven J. and Farias, Paul Abraham},
abstractNote = {High-speed, time-resolved particle image velocimetry with a pulse-burst laser was used to measure the gas-phase velocity upstream and downstream of a shock wave–particle curtain interaction at three shock Mach numbers (1.22, 1.40, and 1.45) at a repetition rate of 37.5 kHz. The particle curtain was formed from free-falling soda-lime particles resulting in volume fractions of 9% or 23% at mid-height, depending on particle diameter (106–125 and 300–355 μm, respectively). Following impingement by a shock wave, a pressure difference was created between the upstream and downstream sides of the curtain, which accelerated flow through the curtain. Jetting of flow through the curtain was observed downstream once deformation of the curtain began, demonstrating a long-term unsteady effect. Using a control volume approach, the unsteady drag on the curtain was estimated from velocity and pressure data. The drag imposed on the curtain has a strong volume fraction dependence with a prolonged unsteadiness following initial shock impingement. Additionally, the data suggest that the resulting pressure difference following the propagation of the reflected and transmitted shock waves is the primary component to curtain drag.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevFluids.2.064301},
journal = {Physical Review Fluids},
number = 6,
volume = 2,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 6
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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  • The interaction of a Mach 1.67 shock wave with a dense particle curtain is quantified using flash radiography. These new data provide a view of particle transport inside a compressible, dense gas–solid flow of high optical opacity. The curtain, composed of 115-µm glass spheres, initially spans 87 % of the test section width and has a streamwise thickness of about 2 mm. Radiograph intensities are converted to particle volume fraction distributions using the Beer–Lambert law. The mass in the particle curtain, as determined from the X-ray data, is in reasonable agreement with that given from a simpler method using amore » load cell and particle imaging. Following shock impingement, the curtain propagates downstream and the peak volume fraction decreases from about 23 to about 4 % over a time of 340 µs. The propagation occurs asymmetrically, with the downstream side of the particle curtain experiencing a greater volume fraction gradient than the upstream side, attributable to the dependence of particle drag on volume fraction. Bulk particle transport is quantified from the time-dependent center of mass of the curtain. Furthermore, the bulk acceleration of the curtain is shown to be greater than that predicted for a single 115-µm particle in a Mach 1.67 shock-induced flow.« less
  • Pulse-burst Particle Image Velocimetry(PIV) has been employed to acquire time-resolved data at 25 kHz of a supersonic jet exhausting into a subsonic compressible crossflow. Data were acquired along the windward boundary of the jet shear layer and used to identify turbulenteddies as they convect downstream in the far-field of the interaction. Eddies were found to have a tendency to occur in closely spaced counter-rotating pairs and are routinely observed in the PIV movies, but the variable orientation of these pairs makes them difficult to detect statistically. Correlated counter-rotating vortices are more strongly observed to pass by at a larger spacing,more » both leading and trailing the reference eddy. This indicates the paired nature of the turbulenteddies and the tendency for these pairs to recur at repeatable spacing. Velocity spectra reveal a peak at a frequency consistent with this larger spacing between shear-layer vortices rotating with identical sign. The spatial scale of these vortices appears similar to previous observations of compressible jets in crossflow. Furthermore,super-sampled velocity spectra to 150 kHz reveal a power-law dependency of –5/3 in the inertial subrange as well as a –1 dependency at lower frequencies attributed to the scales of the dominant shear-layer eddies.« less
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