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Title: BISON

Abstract

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) fuel performance code BISON is a finite element code used to simulate nuclear fuel during irradiation. It contains models for different types of fuel and cladding such as fundamental thermo-physical properties, creep, swelling, porosity, and mechanical interaction. The authors contribute to the code through the development of some of these models, such as newly formulated thermal conductivity, phase redistribution, and thermal expansion models. In addition, solver methods are contributed where appropriate to facilitate calculations. The code is controlled by INL through an export-controlled license similar to other DOE nuclear related codes.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. LANL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
Contributing Org.:
Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)
OSTI Identifier:
1369048
Report Number(s):
BISON; 005349MLTPL00
C17055
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Software
Software Revision:
00
Software Package Number:
005349
Software CPU:
MLTPL
Source Code Available:
Yes
Related Software:
Python
Country of Publication:
United States

Citation Formats

Matthews, Christopher, and Unal, Cetin. BISON. Computer software. Vers. 00. USDOE. 17 May. 2017. Web.
Matthews, Christopher, & Unal, Cetin. (2017, May 17). BISON (Version 00) [Computer software].
Matthews, Christopher, and Unal, Cetin. BISON. Computer software. Version 00. May 17, 2017.
@misc{osti_1369048,
title = {BISON, Version 00},
author = {Matthews, Christopher and Unal, Cetin},
abstractNote = {The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) fuel performance code BISON is a finite element code used to simulate nuclear fuel during irradiation. It contains models for different types of fuel and cladding such as fundamental thermo-physical properties, creep, swelling, porosity, and mechanical interaction. The authors contribute to the code through the development of some of these models, such as newly formulated thermal conductivity, phase redistribution, and thermal expansion models. In addition, solver methods are contributed where appropriate to facilitate calculations. The code is controlled by INL through an export-controlled license similar to other DOE nuclear related codes.},
doi = {},
year = {Wed May 17 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed May 17 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
note =
}

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  • The primary vision for the BISON development team is to deliver a nuclear fuel performance simulation tool that is used to provide a researcher or fuel designer with best estimate calculations of the highly coupled and nonlinear phenomena that govern nuclear fuel behavior. Accurately simulating nuclear fuel behavior is a challenging computational undertaking and verification and validation (V&V) play an important role in realizing this vision. The purpose of this V&V plan is to express the BISON team’s definition of the terms verification and validation, document what we have done regarding V&V, and outline what we plan to do.
  • The northeastern part of the Great Divide basin is a separate, unique, and until recently, little-explored subbasin sometimes called the Bison basin. It is bounded by the Wind River Mountains, Sweetwater-Granite Mountain foreland uplift, Lost Soldier-Wertz structure, and a little-studied very positive east-west structural arch approximately coincident with the Sweetwater-Fremont county line. A comprehensive seismic, Landsat, and subsurface geologic examination or, better, dissection of the Bison basin was initiated in 1978. Numerous oil and gas prospects were delineated by this study. Since this small, 12 by 40 mi (19 by 64 km) basin is bordered by known reserves of 260more » million bbl of oil and 90 million bcf of gas, these prospects proved to be a popular target of the drill bit. At least one of these prospects appears to be productive; others are currently being drilled. The presence of major east-west wrench faults, a well-documented foreland uplift, until recently undrilled surface and subsurface structures, faults with throw measured in tens of thousands of feet, and an oil seep indicate possible additional hydrocarbon potential in the Bison basin that could exceed presently known reserves. Currently drilling wells and abundant already acquired reflection seismic data are the beginning step in an ongoing exploration program of an interesting, complex, and rewarding small basin with a lot of promise.« less
  • The Paleocene Fort Union Formation crops out in the vicinity of the Bison basin, approximately equidistant from the southeast terminus of the Wind River Range and the southwestern edge of the Granite Mountains uplift in central Wyoming. Early Laramide tectonic activity produced a series of uplifts north of the area forming a platform separating the Wind River and Great Divide basins. During middle to late Paleocene, aggrading fluvial systems flowing southward, rapidly deposited a sequence of thin, lenticular conglomerates and medium to coarse-grained planar-bedded sandstones in braided and anastomosing stream channels and carbonaceous overbank silt and claystones. Subaerially exposed interchannelmore » areas developed cyclic pedogenic horizons. Early diagenetic cementation preserved tubular burrows and rhizoliths as well as impressions of fruits, nuts, leaves, and wood. Anomalous silicic cementation of mudstone, sandstone, and conglomerates probably are silcrete soil horizons developed in a warm temperature to subtropical humid climate. The sandstones are multicyclic containing fragments of preexisting siliceous sedimentary rocks (e.g., Tensleep Sandstone, Mowry Shale, and cherts from the Madison, Morrison, and Phosphoria Formations). Reworked glauconite is locally abundant in some Fort Union sandstones, reflecting the proximity of Paleozoic sources. Altered and embayed feldspars are present in trace amounts throughout most of the section, but significant accumulations of fresh feldspar are present near the top, indicating unroofing of Precambrian source before the Eocene.« less
  • Of 33 strains of Pasteurella multocida examined, 14 showed bacteriocin activity and 17 were susceptible to bacteriocin. The activity was increased by about twofold if the cultures were induced with ultraviolet radiation; however, no increase in bacteriocin activity was observed if the potential producer strains were induced with mitomycin C. The bacteriocin activity of potential producer strains was increased if CaCl/sub 2/ was incorporated in the medium. The patterns of bacteriocin susceptibility indicate that these substances may ultimately contribute to a typing scheme for the species. An extra-chromosomal genetic element was not detected when a potential producer strain was notmore » detected when a potential producer strain was tested by the dye-buoyant density gradient method. This fact suggests that the genetic material responsible for bacteriocin activity in P multocida is located on the host chromosome proper.« less

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