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Title: Quicklook overview of model changes in Melcor 2.2: Rev 6342 to Rev 9496

Abstract

MELCOR 2.2 is a significant official release of the MELCOR code with many new models and model improvements. This report provides the code user with a quick review and characterization of new models added, changes to existing models, the effect of code changes during this code development cycle (rev 6342 to rev 9496), a preview of validation results with this code version. More detailed information is found in the code Subversion logs as well as the User Guide and Reference Manuals.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1367442
Report Number(s):
SAND2017-5599
653623
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING

Citation Formats

Humphries, Larry L. Quicklook overview of model changes in Melcor 2.2: Rev 6342 to Rev 9496. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1367442.
Humphries, Larry L. Quicklook overview of model changes in Melcor 2.2: Rev 6342 to Rev 9496. United States. doi:10.2172/1367442.
Humphries, Larry L. Mon . "Quicklook overview of model changes in Melcor 2.2: Rev 6342 to Rev 9496". United States. doi:10.2172/1367442. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1367442.
@article{osti_1367442,
title = {Quicklook overview of model changes in Melcor 2.2: Rev 6342 to Rev 9496},
author = {Humphries, Larry L.},
abstractNote = {MELCOR 2.2 is a significant official release of the MELCOR code with many new models and model improvements. This report provides the code user with a quick review and characterization of new models added, changes to existing models, the effect of code changes during this code development cycle (rev 6342 to rev 9496), a preview of validation results with this code version. More detailed information is found in the code Subversion logs as well as the User Guide and Reference Manuals.},
doi = {10.2172/1367442},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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