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Title: Impact of Expanded North Slope of Alaska Crude Oil Production on Oil Flows in the Contiguous United States (Summary)

Abstract

Crude oil produced on the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) is primarily transported on the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) to in-state refineries and the Valdez Marine Terminal in southern Alaska. From the Terminal, crude oil is loaded onto tankers and is transported to export markets or to three major locations along the U.S. West Coast: Anacortes-Ferndale area (Washington), San Francisco Bay area, and Los Angeles area. North Slope of Alaska production has decreased about 75% since the 1980s, which has reduced utilization of TAPS.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1367438
Report Number(s):
SAND2017-5473R
653556
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM

Citation Formats

DeRosa, Sean e., and Flanagan, Tatiana Paz. Impact of Expanded North Slope of Alaska Crude Oil Production on Oil Flows in the Contiguous United States (Summary). United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1367438.
DeRosa, Sean e., & Flanagan, Tatiana Paz. Impact of Expanded North Slope of Alaska Crude Oil Production on Oil Flows in the Contiguous United States (Summary). United States. doi:10.2172/1367438.
DeRosa, Sean e., and Flanagan, Tatiana Paz. Mon . "Impact of Expanded North Slope of Alaska Crude Oil Production on Oil Flows in the Contiguous United States (Summary)". United States. doi:10.2172/1367438. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1367438.
@article{osti_1367438,
title = {Impact of Expanded North Slope of Alaska Crude Oil Production on Oil Flows in the Contiguous United States (Summary)},
author = {DeRosa, Sean e. and Flanagan, Tatiana Paz},
abstractNote = {Crude oil produced on the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) is primarily transported on the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) to in-state refineries and the Valdez Marine Terminal in southern Alaska. From the Terminal, crude oil is loaded onto tankers and is transported to export markets or to three major locations along the U.S. West Coast: Anacortes-Ferndale area (Washington), San Francisco Bay area, and Los Angeles area. North Slope of Alaska production has decreased about 75% since the 1980s, which has reduced utilization of TAPS.},
doi = {10.2172/1367438},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The National Transportation Fuels Model was used to simulate a hypothetical increase in North Slope of Alaska crude oil production. The results show that the magnitude of production utilized depends in part on the ability of crude oil and refined products infrastructure in the contiguous United States to absorb and adjust to the additional supply. Decisions about expanding North Slope production can use the National Transportation Fuels Model take into account the effects on crude oil flows in the contiguous United States.
  • Examined are: (1) the potential for North Slope crude oil to displace foreign crude oil imports, (2) its resultant impact on our Nation's balance-of-payments, and (3) crude oil production at Elk Hills. Also examined are whether North Slope crude oil is contributing to a surplus of crude oil on the West Coast and the possibilities of alleviating such surplus.
  • Based upon the analysis contained in this report, the following conclusions have been drawn: (1) any of the several long-term pipeline proposals that contemplate shipment of Alaskan North Slope crude oil to pipeline distribution centers east of the Rocky Mountains could benefit all sections of the Nation, including at least a portion of the Northern Tier states; (2) distribution of Alaskan North Slope crude oil to Gulf Coast refineries will help to reduce the dependence of New England and the Middle Atlantic States on imported oil; (3) the Federal Government, in response to Section 18 of the Alaska Natural Gasmore » Transportation Act, is taking those steps necessary to expedite construction of permanent delivery systems; (4) there are significant environmental issues involved in all the pipeline delivery proposals which require additional time for analysis and resolution by the Federal Governments of the U.S. and Canada and the various states that would be transited; (5) the short-term situation regarding the delivery of crude oil to the Northern Tier states could not be addressed in this report; Canadian crude oil export policy is under review; and (6) based upon what is currently known about Canadian export policy, there are available alternatives for the distribution of North Slope crude oil and for providing supplies of crude oil to the Northern Tier states for a period of time sufficient to analyze and resolve the issues surrounding the long-term proposals.« less
  • An assessment is presented of whether, under current price regulations, Alaska North Slope (ANS) crude oil will have a wellhead price such that it provides positive incentives for production of such oil without affecting other domestic crude oil prices (due to the composite wellhead price requirement of Section 8 of the EPAA) in a manner that would result in less production of other domestic crude oil than would otherwise occur.
  • This report presents an analysis of crude oil production trends in the US and focuses on the declining production from old, large fields (surveillance fields). Oi