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Title: Gusts and shear within hurricane eyewalls can exceed offshore wind turbine design standards

Abstract

Here, offshore wind energy development is underway in the U.S., with proposed sites located in hurricane-prone regions. Turbine design criteria outlined by the International Electrotechnical Commission do not encompass the extreme wind speeds and directional shifts of hurricanes stronger than category 2. We examine a hurricane's turbulent eyewall using large-eddy simulations with Cloud Model 1. Gusts and mean wind speeds near the eyewall of a category 5 hurricane exceed the current Class I turbine design threshold of 50 m s –1 mean wind and 70 m s –1 gusts. Largest gust factors occur at the eye-eyewall interface. Further, shifts in wind direction suggest that turbines must rotate or yaw faster than current practice. Although current design standards omit mention of wind direction change across the rotor layer, large values (15–50°) suggest that veer should be considered.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [3];  [4];  [4]
  1. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)
  2. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
  3. National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)
  4. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1366545
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1366546; OSTI ID: 1372623
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5000-67513
Journal ID: ISSN 0094-8276
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Geophysical Research Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 44; Journal Issue: 12; Journal ID: ISSN 0094-8276
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; hurricane boundary layer; LES; wind turbine design; hurricane eyewall; offshore wind energy

Citation Formats

Worsnop, Rochelle P., Lundquist, Julie K., Bryan, George H., Damiani, Rick, and Musial, Walt. Gusts and shear within hurricane eyewalls can exceed offshore wind turbine design standards. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/2017GL073537.
Worsnop, Rochelle P., Lundquist, Julie K., Bryan, George H., Damiani, Rick, & Musial, Walt. Gusts and shear within hurricane eyewalls can exceed offshore wind turbine design standards. United States. doi:10.1002/2017GL073537.
Worsnop, Rochelle P., Lundquist, Julie K., Bryan, George H., Damiani, Rick, and Musial, Walt. Tue . "Gusts and shear within hurricane eyewalls can exceed offshore wind turbine design standards". United States. doi:10.1002/2017GL073537.
@article{osti_1366545,
title = {Gusts and shear within hurricane eyewalls can exceed offshore wind turbine design standards},
author = {Worsnop, Rochelle P. and Lundquist, Julie K. and Bryan, George H. and Damiani, Rick and Musial, Walt},
abstractNote = {Here, offshore wind energy development is underway in the U.S., with proposed sites located in hurricane-prone regions. Turbine design criteria outlined by the International Electrotechnical Commission do not encompass the extreme wind speeds and directional shifts of hurricanes stronger than category 2. We examine a hurricane's turbulent eyewall using large-eddy simulations with Cloud Model 1. Gusts and mean wind speeds near the eyewall of a category 5 hurricane exceed the current Class I turbine design threshold of 50 m s–1 mean wind and 70 m s–1 gusts. Largest gust factors occur at the eye-eyewall interface. Further, shifts in wind direction suggest that turbines must rotate or yaw faster than current practice. Although current design standards omit mention of wind direction change across the rotor layer, large values (15–50°) suggest that veer should be considered.},
doi = {10.1002/2017GL073537},
journal = {Geophysical Research Letters},
number = 12,
volume = 44,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 30 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue May 30 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1002/2017GL073537

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2 works
Citation information provided by
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