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Title: Additive Manufacturing of Porous Metal

Abstract

Currently, helium is obtained through separation from natural gas. The current industrial process incurs significant costs and requires large energy resources to successfully achieve separation. Through utilizing Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies it is possible to reduce both of these burdens when refining helium gas. The ability to engineer porosity levels within Inconel 718 discs for controlled separation of helium from natural gas was investigated. Arrays of samples fabricated using the electron beam melting process were analyzed for their relative porosity density. Based upon the measurements, full scale discs were fabricated, and subsequently tested to determine their effectiveness in separating helium from liquefied natural gas.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1362246
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2017/137
ED2802000; CEED492; CRADA/NFE-15-05778
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 03 NATURAL GAS

Citation Formats

Dehoff, Ryan R., and Kirka, Michael M. Additive Manufacturing of Porous Metal. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1362246.
Dehoff, Ryan R., & Kirka, Michael M. Additive Manufacturing of Porous Metal. United States. doi:10.2172/1362246.
Dehoff, Ryan R., and Kirka, Michael M. 2017. "Additive Manufacturing of Porous Metal". United States. doi:10.2172/1362246. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1362246.
@article{osti_1362246,
title = {Additive Manufacturing of Porous Metal},
author = {Dehoff, Ryan R. and Kirka, Michael M.},
abstractNote = {Currently, helium is obtained through separation from natural gas. The current industrial process incurs significant costs and requires large energy resources to successfully achieve separation. Through utilizing Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies it is possible to reduce both of these burdens when refining helium gas. The ability to engineer porosity levels within Inconel 718 discs for controlled separation of helium from natural gas was investigated. Arrays of samples fabricated using the electron beam melting process were analyzed for their relative porosity density. Based upon the measurements, full scale discs were fabricated, and subsequently tested to determine their effectiveness in separating helium from liquefied natural gas.},
doi = {10.2172/1362246},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 6
}

Technical Report:

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