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Title: Learning from Non-Linear Ecosystem Dynamics Is Vital for Achieving Land Degradation Neutrality

Abstract

Land Degradation Neutrality is one of the Sustainable Development Goal targets, requiring on-going degradation to be balanced by restoration and sustainable land management. However, restoration and efforts to prevent degradation have often failed to deliver expected benefits,despite enormous investments. Better acknowledging the close relationships between climate, land management and non-linear ecosystem dynamics can help restoration activities to meet their intended goals, while supporting climate change adaptation and mitigation. This paper is the first to link ecological theory of non-linear ecosystem dynamics to Land Degradation Neutrality offering essential insights into appropriate timings, climate-induced windows of opportunities and risks and the financial viability of investments. These novel insights are pre-requisites for meaningful o and monitoring of progress towards Land Degradation Neutrality

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [3]
  1. Wageningen Univ. (Netherlands). Soil Physics and Land Management Group
  2. Wageningen Univ. (Netherlands). Soil Physics and Land Management Group; Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom). Sustainability Research Institute, School of Earth and Environment
  3. Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom). Sustainability Research Institute, School of Earth and Environment
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Wageningen Univ (The Netherlands)
Sponsoring Org.:
European Union (EU)
OSTI Identifier:
1362084
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Land Degradation and Development
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Land Degradation and Development; Journal ID: ISSN 1085-3278
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; sustainable land management; ecosystem regime; timing; cost–benefit; window of opportunity and risk

Citation Formats

Sietz, Diana, Fleskens, Luuk, and Stringer, Lindsay C. Learning from Non-Linear Ecosystem Dynamics Is Vital for Achieving Land Degradation Neutrality. Netherlands: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/ldr.2732.
Sietz, Diana, Fleskens, Luuk, & Stringer, Lindsay C. Learning from Non-Linear Ecosystem Dynamics Is Vital for Achieving Land Degradation Neutrality. Netherlands. doi:10.1002/ldr.2732.
Sietz, Diana, Fleskens, Luuk, and Stringer, Lindsay C. Mon . "Learning from Non-Linear Ecosystem Dynamics Is Vital for Achieving Land Degradation Neutrality". Netherlands. doi:10.1002/ldr.2732. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1362084.
@article{osti_1362084,
title = {Learning from Non-Linear Ecosystem Dynamics Is Vital for Achieving Land Degradation Neutrality},
author = {Sietz, Diana and Fleskens, Luuk and Stringer, Lindsay C.},
abstractNote = {Land Degradation Neutrality is one of the Sustainable Development Goal targets, requiring on-going degradation to be balanced by restoration and sustainable land management. However, restoration and efforts to prevent degradation have often failed to deliver expected benefits,despite enormous investments. Better acknowledging the close relationships between climate, land management and non-linear ecosystem dynamics can help restoration activities to meet their intended goals, while supporting climate change adaptation and mitigation. This paper is the first to link ecological theory of non-linear ecosystem dynamics to Land Degradation Neutrality offering essential insights into appropriate timings, climate-induced windows of opportunities and risks and the financial viability of investments. These novel insights are pre-requisites for meaningful o and monitoring of progress towards Land Degradation Neutrality},
doi = {10.1002/ldr.2732},
journal = {Land Degradation and Development},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {Netherlands},
year = {Mon Feb 27 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Feb 27 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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