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Title: Enhancements in mass transfer for carbon capture solvents part II: Micron-sized solid particles

Abstract

The novel small molecule carbonic anhydrase (CA) mimic [CoIII(Salphen-COO-)Cl]HNEt3 (1), was synthesized as an additive for increasing CO2 absorption rates in amine-based post-combustion carbon capture processes (CCS), and its efficacy was verified. 1 was designed for use in a kinetically slow but thermally stable blended solvent, containing the primary amines 1-amino-2-propanol (A2P) and 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP). Together, the A2P/AMP solvent and 1 reduce the overall energy penalty associated with CO2 capture from coal-derived flue gas, relative to the baseline solvent MEA. 1 is also effective at increasing absorption kinetics of kinetically fast solvents, such as MEA, which can reduce capital costs by requiring a smaller absorber tower. The transition from catalyst testing under idealized laboratory conditions, to process relevant lab- and bench-scale testing adds many additional variables that are not well understood and rarely discussed. The stepwise testing of both 1 and the novel A2P/AMP solvent blend is described through a transition process that identifies many of these process and evaluation challenges not often addressed when designing a chemical or catalytic additive for industrial CCS systems, where consideration of solvent chemistry is typically the primary goal.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of Kentucky, Center for Applied Energy Research
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1362045
Grant/Contract Number:
FE0012926
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 61; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 1750-5836
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; Post-combustion; CO2 capture; Mass transfer; Amine; Catalyst; Additives

Citation Formats

Mannel, David S., Qi, Guojie, Widger, Leland R., Bryant, Jonathan, Liu, Kun, Fegenbush, Aaron, Lippert, Cameron A., and Liu, Kunlei. Enhancements in mass transfer for carbon capture solvents part II: Micron-sized solid particles. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2017.03.027.
Mannel, David S., Qi, Guojie, Widger, Leland R., Bryant, Jonathan, Liu, Kun, Fegenbush, Aaron, Lippert, Cameron A., & Liu, Kunlei. Enhancements in mass transfer for carbon capture solvents part II: Micron-sized solid particles. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2017.03.027.
Mannel, David S., Qi, Guojie, Widger, Leland R., Bryant, Jonathan, Liu, Kun, Fegenbush, Aaron, Lippert, Cameron A., and Liu, Kunlei. Thu . "Enhancements in mass transfer for carbon capture solvents part II: Micron-sized solid particles". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2017.03.027.
@article{osti_1362045,
title = {Enhancements in mass transfer for carbon capture solvents part II: Micron-sized solid particles},
author = {Mannel, David S. and Qi, Guojie and Widger, Leland R. and Bryant, Jonathan and Liu, Kun and Fegenbush, Aaron and Lippert, Cameron A. and Liu, Kunlei},
abstractNote = {The novel small molecule carbonic anhydrase (CA) mimic [CoIII(Salphen-COO-)Cl]HNEt3 (1), was synthesized as an additive for increasing CO2 absorption rates in amine-based post-combustion carbon capture processes (CCS), and its efficacy was verified. 1 was designed for use in a kinetically slow but thermally stable blended solvent, containing the primary amines 1-amino-2-propanol (A2P) and 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP). Together, the A2P/AMP solvent and 1 reduce the overall energy penalty associated with CO2 capture from coal-derived flue gas, relative to the baseline solvent MEA. 1 is also effective at increasing absorption kinetics of kinetically fast solvents, such as MEA, which can reduce capital costs by requiring a smaller absorber tower. The transition from catalyst testing under idealized laboratory conditions, to process relevant lab- and bench-scale testing adds many additional variables that are not well understood and rarely discussed. The stepwise testing of both 1 and the novel A2P/AMP solvent blend is described through a transition process that identifies many of these process and evaluation challenges not often addressed when designing a chemical or catalytic additive for industrial CCS systems, where consideration of solvent chemistry is typically the primary goal.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijggc.2017.03.027},
journal = {International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control},
number = C,
volume = 61,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
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