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Title: Absence of detectable MOKE signals from spin Hall effect in metals

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [3]
  1. State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics and Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433, China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing 210093, China
  2. State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics and Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433, China, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697, USA
  3. State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics and Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433, China, Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1361738
Grant/Contract Number:
AC03-76SF00098
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Physics Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 110; Journal Issue: 4; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-02-15 00:19:17; Journal ID: ISSN 0003-6951
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Su, Yudan, Wang, Hua, Li, Jie, Tian, Chuanshan, Wu, Ruqian, Jin, Xiaofeng, and Shen, Y. R. Absence of detectable MOKE signals from spin Hall effect in metals. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4974044.
Su, Yudan, Wang, Hua, Li, Jie, Tian, Chuanshan, Wu, Ruqian, Jin, Xiaofeng, & Shen, Y. R. Absence of detectable MOKE signals from spin Hall effect in metals. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4974044.
Su, Yudan, Wang, Hua, Li, Jie, Tian, Chuanshan, Wu, Ruqian, Jin, Xiaofeng, and Shen, Y. R. Mon . "Absence of detectable MOKE signals from spin Hall effect in metals". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4974044.
@article{osti_1361738,
title = {Absence of detectable MOKE signals from spin Hall effect in metals},
author = {Su, Yudan and Wang, Hua and Li, Jie and Tian, Chuanshan and Wu, Ruqian and Jin, Xiaofeng and Shen, Y. R.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1063/1.4974044},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 4,
volume = 110,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 23 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Jan 23 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1063/1.4974044

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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