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Title: Using Neutron Diffraction to Investigate Texture Evolution During Consolidation of Deuterated Triaminotrinitrobenzene (d-TATB) Explosive Powder

Abstract

Triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) is a highly anisotropic molecular crystal used in several plastic-bonded explosive (PBX) formulations. A complete understanding of the orientation distribution of TATB particles throughout a PBX charge is required to understand spatially variable, anisotropic macroscale properties of the charge. Although texture of these materials can be measured after they have been subjected to mechanical or thermal loads, measuring texture evolution in situ is important in order to identify mechanisms of crystal deformation and reorientation used to better inform thermomechanical models. Neutron diffraction measurements were used to estimate crystallographic reorientation while deuterated TATB (d-TATB) powder was consolidated into a cylindrical pellet via a uniaxial die-pressing operation at room temperature. Both the final texture of the pressed pellet and the in situ evolution of texture during pressing were measured, showing that the d-TATB grains reorient such that (001) poles become preferentially aligned with the pressing direction. A compaction model is used to predict the evolution of texture in the pellet during the pressing process, finding that the original model overpredicted the texture strength compared to these measurements. The theory was extended to account for initial particle shape and pore space, bringing the results into good agreement with the data.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1360703
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-22937
Journal ID: ISSN 2073-4352
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Crystals
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 2073-4352
Publisher:
MDPI
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; neutron diffraction, texture, powder compaction, TATB

Citation Formats

Luscher, Darby J., Yeager, John D., Clausen, Bjørn, Vogel, Sven C., Higginbotham Duque, Amanda L., and Brown, Donald W. Using Neutron Diffraction to Investigate Texture Evolution During Consolidation of Deuterated Triaminotrinitrobenzene (d-TATB) Explosive Powder. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3390/cryst7050138.
Luscher, Darby J., Yeager, John D., Clausen, Bjørn, Vogel, Sven C., Higginbotham Duque, Amanda L., & Brown, Donald W. Using Neutron Diffraction to Investigate Texture Evolution During Consolidation of Deuterated Triaminotrinitrobenzene (d-TATB) Explosive Powder. United States. doi:10.3390/cryst7050138.
Luscher, Darby J., Yeager, John D., Clausen, Bjørn, Vogel, Sven C., Higginbotham Duque, Amanda L., and Brown, Donald W. Sun . "Using Neutron Diffraction to Investigate Texture Evolution During Consolidation of Deuterated Triaminotrinitrobenzene (d-TATB) Explosive Powder". United States. doi:10.3390/cryst7050138. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1360703.
@article{osti_1360703,
title = {Using Neutron Diffraction to Investigate Texture Evolution During Consolidation of Deuterated Triaminotrinitrobenzene (d-TATB) Explosive Powder},
author = {Luscher, Darby J. and Yeager, John D. and Clausen, Bjørn and Vogel, Sven C. and Higginbotham Duque, Amanda L. and Brown, Donald W.},
abstractNote = {Triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) is a highly anisotropic molecular crystal used in several plastic-bonded explosive (PBX) formulations. A complete understanding of the orientation distribution of TATB particles throughout a PBX charge is required to understand spatially variable, anisotropic macroscale properties of the charge. Although texture of these materials can be measured after they have been subjected to mechanical or thermal loads, measuring texture evolution in situ is important in order to identify mechanisms of crystal deformation and reorientation used to better inform thermomechanical models. Neutron diffraction measurements were used to estimate crystallographic reorientation while deuterated TATB (d-TATB) powder was consolidated into a cylindrical pellet via a uniaxial die-pressing operation at room temperature. Both the final texture of the pressed pellet and the in situ evolution of texture during pressing were measured, showing that the d-TATB grains reorient such that (001) poles become preferentially aligned with the pressing direction. A compaction model is used to predict the evolution of texture in the pellet during the pressing process, finding that the original model overpredicted the texture strength compared to these measurements. The theory was extended to account for initial particle shape and pore space, bringing the results into good agreement with the data.},
doi = {10.3390/cryst7050138},
journal = {Crystals},
number = 5,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun May 14 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sun May 14 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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