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Title: Quantifying and Understanding Effects from Wildlife, Radar, and Public Engagement on Future Wind Deployment

Abstract

This presentation provides an overview of findings from a report published in 2016 by researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, An Initial Evaluation of Siting Considerations on Current and Future Wind Deployment. The presentation covers the background for research, the Energy Department's Wind Vision, research methods, siting considerations, the wind project deployment process, and costs associated with siting considerations.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1360669
Report Number(s):
NREL/PR-5000-68519
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the American Wind Energy Association's (AWEA) WINDPOWER 2017 Conference & Exhibition, 22-25 May 2017, Anaheim, California
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; wind energy; wind turbines; siting; wildlife considerations; radar; stakeholder engagement; public engagement; wind project siting

Citation Formats

Tegen, Suzanne. Quantifying and Understanding Effects from Wildlife, Radar, and Public Engagement on Future Wind Deployment. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Tegen, Suzanne. Quantifying and Understanding Effects from Wildlife, Radar, and Public Engagement on Future Wind Deployment. United States.
Tegen, Suzanne. 2017. "Quantifying and Understanding Effects from Wildlife, Radar, and Public Engagement on Future Wind Deployment". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1360669.
@article{osti_1360669,
title = {Quantifying and Understanding Effects from Wildlife, Radar, and Public Engagement on Future Wind Deployment},
author = {Tegen, Suzanne},
abstractNote = {This presentation provides an overview of findings from a report published in 2016 by researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, An Initial Evaluation of Siting Considerations on Current and Future Wind Deployment. The presentation covers the background for research, the Energy Department's Wind Vision, research methods, siting considerations, the wind project deployment process, and costs associated with siting considerations.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}

Conference:
Other availability
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