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Title: Structure of ‘linkerless’ hydroxamic acid inhibitor-HDAC8 complex confirms the formation of an isoform-specific subpocket

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1359493
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Structural Biology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 195; Journal Issue: 3; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-04 16:27:35; Journal ID: ISSN 1047-8477
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Tabackman, Alexa A., Frankson, Rochelle, Marsan, Eric S., Perry, Kay, and Cole, Kathryn E. Structure of ‘linkerless’ hydroxamic acid inhibitor-HDAC8 complex confirms the formation of an isoform-specific subpocket. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jsb.2016.06.023.
Tabackman, Alexa A., Frankson, Rochelle, Marsan, Eric S., Perry, Kay, & Cole, Kathryn E. Structure of ‘linkerless’ hydroxamic acid inhibitor-HDAC8 complex confirms the formation of an isoform-specific subpocket. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jsb.2016.06.023.
Tabackman, Alexa A., Frankson, Rochelle, Marsan, Eric S., Perry, Kay, and Cole, Kathryn E. 2016. "Structure of ‘linkerless’ hydroxamic acid inhibitor-HDAC8 complex confirms the formation of an isoform-specific subpocket". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jsb.2016.06.023.
@article{osti_1359493,
title = {Structure of ‘linkerless’ hydroxamic acid inhibitor-HDAC8 complex confirms the formation of an isoform-specific subpocket},
author = {Tabackman, Alexa A. and Frankson, Rochelle and Marsan, Eric S. and Perry, Kay and Cole, Kathryn E.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.jsb.2016.06.023},
journal = {Journal of Structural Biology},
number = 3,
volume = 195,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.jsb.2016.06.023

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
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