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Title: Assessment of arsenic speciation and bioaccessibility in mine-impacted materials

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1359346
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Hazardous Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 313; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-04 09:15:47; Journal ID: ISSN 0304-3894
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Ollson, Cameron J., Smith, Euan, Scheckel, Kirk G., Betts, Aaron R., and Juhasz, Albert L. Assessment of arsenic speciation and bioaccessibility in mine-impacted materials. Netherlands: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jhazmat.2016.03.090.
Ollson, Cameron J., Smith, Euan, Scheckel, Kirk G., Betts, Aaron R., & Juhasz, Albert L. Assessment of arsenic speciation and bioaccessibility in mine-impacted materials. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.jhazmat.2016.03.090.
Ollson, Cameron J., Smith, Euan, Scheckel, Kirk G., Betts, Aaron R., and Juhasz, Albert L. 2016. "Assessment of arsenic speciation and bioaccessibility in mine-impacted materials". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.jhazmat.2016.03.090.
@article{osti_1359346,
title = {Assessment of arsenic speciation and bioaccessibility in mine-impacted materials},
author = {Ollson, Cameron J. and Smith, Euan and Scheckel, Kirk G. and Betts, Aaron R. and Juhasz, Albert L.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.jhazmat.2016.03.090},
journal = {Journal of Hazardous Materials},
number = C,
volume = 313,
place = {Netherlands},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2016.03.090

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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