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Title: Application of morphological synthesis for understanding electrode microstructure evolution as a function of applied charge/discharge cycles

Abstract

Morphological analysis and synthesis operations were employed for analysis of electrode microstructure transformations and evolution accompanying the application of charge/discharge cycles to electrochemical storage systems (batteries). Using state-of-the-art morphological algorithms, it was possible to predict microstructure evolution in porous Si electrodes for Li-ion batteries with sufficient accuracy. Algorithms for image analyses (segmentation, feature extraction, and 3D-reconstructions using 2D-images) were also developed. Altogether, these techniques could be considered supplementary to phase-field mesoscopic approach to microstructure evolution that is based upon clear and definitive changes in the appearance of microstructure. However, unlike in phase-field, the governing equations for morphological approach are geometry-, not physics-based. Similar non-physics based approach to understanding different phenomena was attempted with the introduction of cellular automata. It is anticipated that morphological synthesis and analysis will represent a useful supplementary tool to phase-field and will render assistance to unraveling the underlying microstructure-property relationships. The paper contains data on electrochemical characterization of different electrode materials that was conducted in parallel to morphological study.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
  2. Moscow State Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1357755
Report Number(s):
INL/JOU-16-38562
Journal ID: ISSN 0947-8396; PII: 401
Grant/Contract Number:
AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Physics. A, Materials Science and Processing
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 122; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 0947-8396
Publisher:
Springer
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE; Battery Electrode Material Degradation; Morphological Analysis; Morphological Synthesis

Citation Formats

Glazoff, Michael V., Dufek, Eric J., and Shalashnikov, Egor V. Application of morphological synthesis for understanding electrode microstructure evolution as a function of applied charge/discharge cycles. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1007/s00339-016-0401-4.
Glazoff, Michael V., Dufek, Eric J., & Shalashnikov, Egor V. Application of morphological synthesis for understanding electrode microstructure evolution as a function of applied charge/discharge cycles. United States. doi:10.1007/s00339-016-0401-4.
Glazoff, Michael V., Dufek, Eric J., and Shalashnikov, Egor V. 2016. "Application of morphological synthesis for understanding electrode microstructure evolution as a function of applied charge/discharge cycles". United States. doi:10.1007/s00339-016-0401-4. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1357755.
@article{osti_1357755,
title = {Application of morphological synthesis for understanding electrode microstructure evolution as a function of applied charge/discharge cycles},
author = {Glazoff, Michael V. and Dufek, Eric J. and Shalashnikov, Egor V.},
abstractNote = {Morphological analysis and synthesis operations were employed for analysis of electrode microstructure transformations and evolution accompanying the application of charge/discharge cycles to electrochemical storage systems (batteries). Using state-of-the-art morphological algorithms, it was possible to predict microstructure evolution in porous Si electrodes for Li-ion batteries with sufficient accuracy. Algorithms for image analyses (segmentation, feature extraction, and 3D-reconstructions using 2D-images) were also developed. Altogether, these techniques could be considered supplementary to phase-field mesoscopic approach to microstructure evolution that is based upon clear and definitive changes in the appearance of microstructure. However, unlike in phase-field, the governing equations for morphological approach are geometry-, not physics-based. Similar non-physics based approach to understanding different phenomena was attempted with the introduction of cellular automata. It is anticipated that morphological synthesis and analysis will represent a useful supplementary tool to phase-field and will render assistance to unraveling the underlying microstructure-property relationships. The paper contains data on electrochemical characterization of different electrode materials that was conducted in parallel to morphological study.},
doi = {10.1007/s00339-016-0401-4},
journal = {Applied Physics. A, Materials Science and Processing},
number = 10,
volume = 122,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

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