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Title: Weld Development for Aluminum Fission Chamber

Abstract

The Sigma welding team was approached to help fabricate a small fission chamber (roughly ½ inch dia. x ½ inch tall cylinder). These chambers are used as radiation sensors that contain small traces of radionuclides (Cf 252, U 235, and U 238) that serve to ionize gas atoms in addition to external radiation. When a voltage is applied within the chamber, the resulting ion flow can be calibrated and monitored. Aluminum has the advantage of not forming radioactive compounds when exposed to high external radiation (except from minor Na alloy content). Since aluminum has not been used before in this application, this presented an unexplored challenge.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). Office of Defense Nuclear Security (NA-70)
OSTI Identifier:
1357147
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-23982
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; aluminum; weld; development

Citation Formats

Cross, Carl Edward, and Martinez, Jesse Norris. Weld Development for Aluminum Fission Chamber. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1357147.
Cross, Carl Edward, & Martinez, Jesse Norris. Weld Development for Aluminum Fission Chamber. United States. doi:10.2172/1357147.
Cross, Carl Edward, and Martinez, Jesse Norris. Tue . "Weld Development for Aluminum Fission Chamber". United States. doi:10.2172/1357147. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1357147.
@article{osti_1357147,
title = {Weld Development for Aluminum Fission Chamber},
author = {Cross, Carl Edward and Martinez, Jesse Norris},
abstractNote = {The Sigma welding team was approached to help fabricate a small fission chamber (roughly ½ inch dia. x ½ inch tall cylinder). These chambers are used as radiation sensors that contain small traces of radionuclides (Cf 252, U 235, and U 238) that serve to ionize gas atoms in addition to external radiation. When a voltage is applied within the chamber, the resulting ion flow can be calibrated and monitored. Aluminum has the advantage of not forming radioactive compounds when exposed to high external radiation (except from minor Na alloy content). Since aluminum has not been used before in this application, this presented an unexplored challenge.},
doi = {10.2172/1357147},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 16 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue May 16 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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