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Title: Analysis of Multilayer Devices for Superconducting Electronics by High-Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy

Abstract

We used a focused ion beam to obtain cross-sectional specimens from both magnetic multilayer and Nb/Al-AlOx/Nb Josephson junction devices for characterization by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). An automated multivariate statistical analysis of the EDX spectral images produced chemically unique component images of individual layers within the multilayer structures. STEM imaging elucidated distinct variations in film morphology, interface quality, and/or etch artifacts that could be correlated to magnetic and/or electrical properties measured on the same devices.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [4];  [4];  [4]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  2. New York Univ., NY (United States)
  3. HYPRES Inc., Elmsford, NY (United States)
  4. Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Lexington, MA (United States). Lincoln Lab.
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA)
OSTI Identifier:
1356860
Report Number(s):
SAND2017-4569J
Journal ID: ISSN 1051-8223; 652917; TRN: US1702157
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 27; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 1051-8223
Publisher:
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; Josephson junctions; magnetic multilayers; superconducting materials; scanning transmission electron microscopy

Citation Formats

Missert, Nancy, Kotula, Paul G., Rye, Michael, Rehm, Laura, Sluka, Volker, Kent, Andrew D., Yohannes, Daniel, Kirichenko, Alex F., Vernik, Igor V., Mukhanov, Oleg A., Bolkhovsky, Vladimir, Wynn, Alex, Johnson, Leonard, and Gouker, Mark. Analysis of Multilayer Devices for Superconducting Electronics by High-Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1109/tasc.2017.2669579.
Missert, Nancy, Kotula, Paul G., Rye, Michael, Rehm, Laura, Sluka, Volker, Kent, Andrew D., Yohannes, Daniel, Kirichenko, Alex F., Vernik, Igor V., Mukhanov, Oleg A., Bolkhovsky, Vladimir, Wynn, Alex, Johnson, Leonard, & Gouker, Mark. Analysis of Multilayer Devices for Superconducting Electronics by High-Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy. United States. doi:10.1109/tasc.2017.2669579.
Missert, Nancy, Kotula, Paul G., Rye, Michael, Rehm, Laura, Sluka, Volker, Kent, Andrew D., Yohannes, Daniel, Kirichenko, Alex F., Vernik, Igor V., Mukhanov, Oleg A., Bolkhovsky, Vladimir, Wynn, Alex, Johnson, Leonard, and Gouker, Mark. Wed . "Analysis of Multilayer Devices for Superconducting Electronics by High-Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy". United States. doi:10.1109/tasc.2017.2669579. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1356860.
@article{osti_1356860,
title = {Analysis of Multilayer Devices for Superconducting Electronics by High-Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy},
author = {Missert, Nancy and Kotula, Paul G. and Rye, Michael and Rehm, Laura and Sluka, Volker and Kent, Andrew D. and Yohannes, Daniel and Kirichenko, Alex F. and Vernik, Igor V. and Mukhanov, Oleg A. and Bolkhovsky, Vladimir and Wynn, Alex and Johnson, Leonard and Gouker, Mark},
abstractNote = {We used a focused ion beam to obtain cross-sectional specimens from both magnetic multilayer and Nb/Al-AlOx/Nb Josephson junction devices for characterization by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). An automated multivariate statistical analysis of the EDX spectral images produced chemically unique component images of individual layers within the multilayer structures. STEM imaging elucidated distinct variations in film morphology, interface quality, and/or etch artifacts that could be correlated to magnetic and/or electrical properties measured on the same devices.},
doi = {10.1109/tasc.2017.2669579},
journal = {IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity},
number = 4,
volume = 27,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
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